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Updated: 34 min 23 sec ago

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Student Symposium, May 17

34 min 23 sec ago
A Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Student Symposium for California graduate students is being held as part of the annual meeting of the International Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells in the Economy (IPHE). Dignitaries from around the world will gather to
discuss the latest advances in fuel cell and hydrogen (FCH) technologies, commercialization initiatives, and opportunities for international collaboration.

The meeting will offer attendees the opportunity to learn about the role of FCH technologies and the growing market for FCH applications, understand the needs and opportunities in the associated workforce, and directly engage with leaders in the
academic, government and private sectors through a series of small-table discussions. Students from applied sciences, engineering, business, policy, marketing, and public affairs are encouraged to attend.
Students from California and other universities are invited to attend by RSVP using the link below. The program will include:
1. An overview of the latest hydrogen/fuel cell technology status
2. California university educational and training programs
3. Industry representatives discussing employment opportunities
4. Remaining challenges and policy developments

We hope you can join us for a provocative afternoon of discussion, small-group interactive sessions, displays, and Q&A about the latest FCH technologies with leading experts!
For more information contact: Michael Mills (michael.mills@ee.doe.gov)

Please RSVP through the “Education and Outreach Event” link at: http://iphe.net

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy

A Conversation with Lisa Jackson, Apple Senior VP for Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives, May 3

34 min 23 sec ago
Join us for a morning conversation between Apple’s Lisa Jackson and School of Public Health Dean Stefano Bertozzi. Hear Lisa’s story about her journey from the EPA to Apple, and how one of the world’s most innovative companies is tackling critical environmental challenges. Discussion topics will include the intersection between climate change, policy, and public health and lessons learned from the EPA and Apple. There will be an opportunity for Q&A with the audience, you can also tweet a question to Lisa in advance or during the talk @lisapjackson or using #BerkeleyHealthDSS.

Lisa Jackson is Apple’s vice president of Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives, reporting to CEO Tim Cook. Lisa oversees Apple's efforts to minimize its impact on the environment by addressing climate change through renewable energy and energy efficiency, using greener materials, and inventing new ways to conserve precious resources. She is also responsible for Apple’s education policy programs such as ConnectED, its product accessibility work, and its worldwide government affairs function. From 2009 to 2013, Lisa served as Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Appointed by President Barack Obama, she focused on reducing greenhouse gases, protecting air and water quality, preventing exposure to toxic contamination, and expanding outreach to communities on environmental issues. She has also served as Chief of Staff to New Jersey Governor Jon S. Corzine and as Commissioner of New Jersey’s Department of Environmental Protection. Lisa holds a master's degree in Chemical Engineering from Princeton University and a bachelor's degree in Chemical Engineering from Tulane University. She serves on the boards of Princeton, Tulane, and the Clinton Foundation.

This talk is part of the 2015-2016 UC Berkeley School of Public Health Dean’s Speaker Series. It is co-sponsored by the Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society
(CITRIS).

The 2015-2016 UC Berkeley School of Public Health Dean's Speaker Series is designed to bring distinguished experts to Berkeley and engage the community on a variety of current and important topics in the field of public health.

Hierarchical Urban Transit System Design for Optimizing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Costs, May 13

34 min 23 sec ago
In recent decades, public transportation’s role in mitigating climate change has received more attention. However, many current transit systems are not designed to reduce environmental impacts. In the U.S., the average energy intensity of transit buses is even higher than passenger cars due to the current low ridership rate of transit buses. This motivates our study of the benefits of design and operational approaches for reducing the environmental impacts of transit systems. One potential approach to reducing transit emissions is through lowering the operational frequency and spatial coverage, i.e., the transit level of service (LOS). By using the continuum approximation method, we quantify the emissions saved when reducing the transit LOS in various city scenarios. We also study the unintended situations where the lowered transit LOS results in more city-wide emissions because some transit users may not tolerate the service and will switch to faster modes, such as private automobiles. The analysis is based on a transit system with a hierarchical structure (trunk and feeder lines) providing service to a city where demand is elastic. By considering the interactions between the trunk and the feeder systems, we provide a quantitative basis for designing and operating integrated urban transit systems that can reduce GHG emissions and societal costs. A case study of the MUNI bus network for the city of San Francisco is also included in the presentation.

Bio:
Han Cheng is a Ph.D. candidate in Civil and Environmental Engineering at University of California, Berkeley. He received his masters degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 2014, and his two bachelor degrees in Civil Engineering and Economics from Tsinghua University in 2013. His research interest lies in transportation infrastructure management and network optimization considering multi-objectives from economic and environmental perspectives.

PL-58 Managing Transportation and Land Use Interactions, May 3-6

34 min 23 sec ago
Transportation networks are one of the most powerful influences of local land use patterns. Local land use decisions shape the demand for transportation services and improvements. Managing this interaction to achieve multiple goals is one of the more difficult problems for planners and engineers. This new online course covers how to create successful plans and projects, how to address land use and transportation as an integrated system, how land use and transportation goals are changing the way we approach traffic management, , including how to identify key feedback relationships in your community; how to develop alternatives that balance competing goals and increase choice; and how to communicate the interactive nature of transportation and land use investments to decision-makers.

TE-10 Traffic Signal Operations: Advanced Applications, May 11-12

34 min 23 sec ago
This two-day course focusing on advanced signal operations topics, will enable you to develop and evaluate performance of two types of traffic signal coordination -- time of day and traffic responsive systems. This course also introduces the advanced traffic adaptive system. For time of day and traffic responsive systems, attendees learn how to determine good timing and coordinated solutions with innovative approaches for managing vehicle queues, turns, and potential gridlock situations, how to find optimal timing solutions, and how to safely accommodate non-motorists. Students will work on signal timing plans using several signals along arterials including freeway interchange signals; assess whether more complex timing solutions offer operational improvements; solve specialized problems such as offset intersections and diamond interchanges; and learn to perform analysis and evaluation of traffic volumes and field checks. The operational concept for traffic adaptive systems will be introduced and results compared with results from the time of day and traffic responsive plans. A basic knowledge of SYNCHRO is helpful.

PL-02 Funding and Programming Transportation Projects in California, May 19-20

34 min 23 sec ago
Funding state and local highway projects in California has become a complex process involving multiple inter-related federal, state, regional, and local planning and operating agencies as well as an alphabet soup of documents and funding programs. The process is further complicated by changing requirements and shifting political priorities. Without a map and a strategy for developing fundable projects, public agencies risk losing funding opportunities. This course explains how the process works in the "real world" and provides planners, project managers and grant managers with guidelines for thinking strategically as they develop fiscal plans, programs, and project descriptions.

IDM-27 Superpave Mix Design for Local Agencies, May 24-26

34 min 23 sec ago
The SUPERPAVE mix design method is designed to replace the Hveem method. California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) started implementing the national SUPERPAVE standard for designing, specifying, and accepting pavement projects for all state jobs. The new mix design accounts for traffic loading and environmental conditions and includes a new method of evaluating the asphalt mixture. This course provides an overview of the SUPERPAVE mix design for local agencies and adjustments needed to start transitioning to the new mix design.

TE-41 Traffic Signal Design: Complete Streets Application, Jun 6-7

34 min 23 sec ago
This new course introduces the practical design considerations in traffic signal designs that are above and beyond the basic introductions. Within the framework of the California Vehicle Code, the California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (CA MUTCD), and other national and state references with recommended practices and real-world illustrations, this course will explore the multi-modal design expectations from today's traffic signal designers in a complete-street environment.

This course will introduce complex signal phasing diagrams, typical features of controller firmware, and configuration of signal cabinets; and signal indications/heads placement and detection layout with respect to design applications for rail crossings, emergency vehicles, bus transit, bicycles, pedestrians, and cars. Additionally, this course will introduce the design concept for bus rapid transit (BRT), light rail transit (LRT) and heavy rail.

The course includes lectures, sample problems, and exercise projects that will familiarize the course participant with the design process that starts with preliminary and progress design submittals, as well as formats of design review comments and resolutions expected by typical public agencies. While this course is suitable for traffic signal designers with varying experience, this course will be introduced as a sequential next-level course to Tech Transfer's TE-02 (Traffic Signal Design: Engineering Concepts), or equivalent. The goal is for the course participants to become familiar with real-world, multi-modal, signal-design applications that accommodate various street types and intersections users.

AV-12 Airport Systems Planning and Design (45th Annual Short Course), Jun 13-16

34 min 24 sec ago
The course is being offered in association with the National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research. This four-day course covers the broad spectrum of airport planning and design issues within the evolving context of the air transportation industry. It provides an introduction to issues that arise in planning airport systems and the development of new and existing airports, as well as the design of airport facilities to handle both aircraft and passenger demand. These issues are examined in the context of recent trends in airline service, fuel costs, industry structure and evolving efforts to address climate change and sustainability. The course provides an opportunity to explore these issues with experts from different segments of the industry. The topics covered range from airport and airline economics and travel demand forecasting to airport capacity analysis, noise analysis, and environmental planning. Airfield design, passenger processing, and airport ground access are also discussed. The past fifteen years have been a period of great turmoil in the airline industry. Following a decade of fairly steady growth in air travel and air cargo demand that resulted in then-record levels of air traffic in 2000, a slowdown in economic growth starting in 2001 together with the terrorist attacks of September 11 and the impacts of the resulting security measures led to a steep decline in air travel. As a result of significantly improved airport security and a rebounding economy, the growth in air travel resumed as the decade progressed and by 2005 air traffic had exceeded pre-September 11 levels. Over the next two years air traffic continued to grow and most airlines were again able to achieve profitability. Industry trends showed a continued growth of low-cost carriers, the expanded use of regional jets in markets previously served by larger aircraft, and increased point-to-point service. As a result, airports were again experiencing increased congestion and delays.Then oil prices soared, driving up the cost of aviation fuel and wiping out the gains in airline profitability, quickly followed by a collapse of the financial markets and a severe recession. Since mid-2012 , the economy has been continuing a slow recovery from this recession, although air travel has not yet returned to pre-recession levels, in part due to higher air fares as airlines struggle to achieve profitability in the face of high fuel prices. However, future air traffic growth is forecast to reach traffic levels that exceed the previous peak by 2015 and to continue growing thereafter, presenting new challenges for those involved in airport planning and design. Complicating this situation are growing pressures to respond to longer term concerns about climate change and sustainability.

PL-11 Complete Streets Planning and Design, Jun 15-16

34 min 24 sec ago
Complete Streets are planned, designed, operated, and maintained to provide safe and comfortable travel for all users of all ages. Complete Streets provide for all modes of transportation, including pedestrians, bicyclists, transit vehicles, and motorists, as well as allow for emergency response, road maintenance, and goods movement. This course covers the planning and design of Complete Streets, including the history of Complete Streets; the policy environment for Complete Streets, particularly in the California legislative environment; how to integrate Complete Streets with the urban planning process; and how to design streets, intersections, crossings, and interchanges consistent with the Complete Streets approach.

TE-08 Type 170 Traffic Signal Controller, Apr 20-21

April 21, 2016 - 11:52pm
The Type 170 traffic signal controller is widely used in California. This hands-on course covers all key topics needed to understand the capabilities and uses of the 170 controller, including hardware and software, communication protocols, how to program signal timing plans into the controller, and how to maintain the equipment and trouble-shoot problems. Students will engage in numerous hands-on exercises in a combined controller and computer lab.

NOTE: The companion course, Type 2070 Traffic Signal Controller (TE-09), requires a separate registration.

TE-08 Type 170 Traffic Signal Controller, Apr 20-21

April 20, 2016 - 11:53pm
The Type 170 traffic signal controller is widely used in California. This hands-on course covers all key topics needed to understand the capabilities and uses of the 170 controller, including hardware and software, communication protocols, how to program signal timing plans into the controller, and how to maintain the equipment and trouble-shoot problems. Students will engage in numerous hands-on exercises in a combined controller and computer lab.

NOTE: The companion course, Type 2070 Traffic Signal Controller (TE-09), requires a separate registration.

Adaptive Routing and Traffic Control under the Connected Vehicle Environment, Apr 15

April 15, 2016 - 11:48pm
In real life traffic networks, travelers’ experiences of delays at intersections affect their route choices, and their choices of routes affect intersection traffic operations through changes in traffic demand and therefore travel delays. In this talk, we present a joint routing-traffic control framework under the connected vehicle environment, where travelers can have access to real-time traffic information and optimize their routes based on hyper-path trees, while the traffic signals adaptively change their timing plans in response to changes in traffic demand. We tested our routing algorithm and control strategies in VENTOS, a simulation platform that integrates wireless network simulator OmNet++ and traffic mobility simulator SUMO (Simulation of Urban MObility) under several scenarios. The simulation results show that the proposed joint routing/control framework can reduce the overall travel time of the network significantly, and the variance of travel speeds within the network. Work on analyzing the stability of the transportation network under such control is still in progress and will be reported as the results come in.

Bio:
Professor H. Michael Zhang teaches in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California Davis. He received a BS in Civil Engineering from Tongji University (1984), a MS in Engineering from the University of California at Irvine (1993), and a PhD in Civil Engineering from the University of California at Irvine (1995). He held faculty appointments at the University of Iowa before moving in 1998 to the University of California, Davis. He studies modeling, estimation, and control of transportation systems. His recent research focuses on applying both traffic flow and system theories to congestion management. He is a member of the Committee on Traffic Flow Theory and Characteristics, the Transportation Research Board, and the National Research Council, and serves on the editorial boards of Transportation Research, Part B (Associate Editor), Transportation Science (Associate Editor), and Journal of Network and Spatial Economics (Area Editor). He has been awarded the University of California Regents Fellowship, the Old Gold Fellowship from The University of Iowa, and the Career Award from the National Science Foundation.

TE-04 Traffic Signal Operations: Fundamental Concepts, Apr 13-14

April 14, 2016 - 11:45pm
This course covers the basic concepts and practical applications and operations of traffic signal timing systems for isolated and coordinated intersections. The course engages students through hands-on exercises and real-world examples of signal timing and operations. Some class exercises and demonstrations are taught in a computer lab. A basic knowledge of EXCEL is needed to complete the exercises. NOTE: This is an introductory course in a series of courses on traffic signal operations offered by the Technology Transfer Program. It is strongly recommended that students complete this course before taking either Traffic Signal Operations: Advanced Applications (TE-10) or SYNCHRO and SimTraffic (TE-13). It is also helpful for students to complete this course before taking Type 170 Traffic Signal Controller (TE-08) or Type 2070 Traffic Signal Controller (TE-09).

TE-32 Pedestrian Facility Design, Apr 12-14

April 14, 2016 - 11:45pm
State and federal policies assert that pedestrian facilities are important parts of a multi-modal transportation system. Communities across California are asking for more emphasis on walkability, with facilities that are safe and comfortable for all pedestrians, including those who are disabled. This new course covers principles and good practices, including how to plan, design, and operate a wide range of pedestrian-friendly facilities, including sidewalks, crosswalks, and other public spaces adjoining or intersecting the vehicular transportation system. Application of current standards and guidelines is emphasized. Case studies supplement lectures.

TE-32 Pedestrian Facility Design, Apr 12-14

April 13, 2016 - 10:49pm
State and federal policies assert that pedestrian facilities are important parts of a multi-modal transportation system. Communities across California are asking for more emphasis on walkability, with facilities that are safe and comfortable for all pedestrians, including those who are disabled. This new course covers principles and good practices, including how to plan, design, and operate a wide range of pedestrian-friendly facilities, including sidewalks, crosswalks, and other public spaces adjoining or intersecting the vehicular transportation system. Application of current standards and guidelines is emphasized. Case studies supplement lectures.

Transformative Governance – speeding up change in global energy systems, Apr 13

April 13, 2016 - 10:49pm
Some energy systems around the world are changing rapidly – for example, Denmark and Germany. Other countries or US States are putting in place / exploring governance which should lead to fundamental change, for example NY State in the US and India. It is clear that there is a strong momentum within Europe and the US towards more renewables and energy efficient systems, and accompanying changes within system operation to better accommodate renewables and make them more flexible – both on the supply and demand side. If one takes the view that the energy system is a whole system – on all sorts of levels – one would expect these changes to roll out around the globe, even if it takes a few decades to occur. However, Asia for example, remains a region with very different country paths – [ranging from Australia and its rapid solar and wind decentralisation, to China and its multi –technology development path and Taiwan and South Korea with VI single monopoly systems] and far greater acceptance of nuclear power. The strength and insularity of these two energy systems will be explored

Catherine Mitchell is Professor of Energy Policy at the University of Exeter. Previously, she has worked at the Universities of Warwick, Sussex and California, Berkeley. She holds a PhD from SPRU, Sussex University in Technology and Innovation Policy. Catherine is currently working on an Established Career Fellowship with the EPSRC (2012-2016) on the relationship between innovation and governance. As part of this, she has taken up Visiting Scholarships / Professorships in the Energy and Resource Group, UCal Berkeley; the Centre for Global Energy Policy at the University of Columbia, NY; and at the Environmental Policy Research Centre at FFU in Berlin. She is the Chair of the Regulatory Assistance Project; is on the Editorial Advisory Board of Nature Energy; is on the Board of the GB Energy and Climate Intelligence Unit and the GB Centre for Sustainable Energy; and is a Member of IPPRs Policy Advisory Committee. Catherine was a Lead Author in the IPCC’s Fifth Assessment Report (2014), a Co-ordinating Lead Author of the IPCC’s Special Report on Renewable Energy and Climate Change Mitigation (2011); and a Lead Analyst on the Global Energy Assessment undertaken through the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) (2012). She has served on several panels advising the GB government, including the Energy Advisory Panel (1998-2003), the Balancing and Settlement Code Panel (2008-2010), the Academic Advisory Panel to DECC for Electricity Market Reform (2010), and DECC’s Distributed Generation Advisory Panel (2012). She chaired the British Institute of Energy Economics in 2009-10, and has advised numerous national and international companies, NGOs and institutions on various aspects of the transition to a sustainable energy system.

TE-04 Traffic Signal Operations: Fundamental Concepts, Apr 13-14

April 13, 2016 - 10:49pm
This course covers the basic concepts and practical applications and operations of traffic signal timing systems for isolated and coordinated intersections. The course engages students through hands-on exercises and real-world examples of signal timing and operations. Some class exercises and demonstrations are taught in a computer lab. A basic knowledge of EXCEL is needed to complete the exercises. NOTE: This is an introductory course in a series of courses on traffic signal operations offered by the Technology Transfer Program. It is strongly recommended that students complete this course before taking either Traffic Signal Operations: Advanced Applications (TE-10) or SYNCHRO and SimTraffic (TE-13). It is also helpful for students to complete this course before taking Type 170 Traffic Signal Controller (TE-08) or Type 2070 Traffic Signal Controller (TE-09).

TE-32 Pedestrian Facility Design, Apr 12-14

April 12, 2016 - 11:50pm
State and federal policies assert that pedestrian facilities are important parts of a multi-modal transportation system. Communities across California are asking for more emphasis on walkability, with facilities that are safe and comfortable for all pedestrians, including those who are disabled. This new course covers principles and good practices, including how to plan, design, and operate a wide range of pedestrian-friendly facilities, including sidewalks, crosswalks, and other public spaces adjoining or intersecting the vehicular transportation system. Application of current standards and guidelines is emphasized. Case studies supplement lectures.

2016 Lela Morris COEH Symposium, May 6

April 12, 2016 - 2:51pm
In this symposium, an exciting panel of speakers will provide an overview of how the changing world of work – the new contingent workforce, widening income inequality, and effects on the labor movement – are impacting occupational safety and health.

Specific California topics will be covered, including temporary and subcontracted workers in the state, farm workers as contingent workers, and the Cal/OSHA perspective about contingent workers.

A panel will discuss the impact of the changing workforce from the perspective of a staffing agency, a union, and a sharing economy business, along with a discussion of contingent workers and workers’ compensation.

Featured speakers are Lenny Mendoca (Director Emeritus of McKinsey & Company) and John Howard (Director of NIOSH).