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Updated: 1 hour 9 min ago

Resilient Transportation Networks: Strategic routing and value of information, Sep 9

1 hour 9 min ago
In recent years, commuters are increasingly relying on traffic navigation applications (e.g., Waze, Google maps) to decide their routes and departure times. This talk focuses on the question of estimating the social value of such navigation systems. We present a game theoretic modeling framework for traffic routing in environments where the route costs are determined by a random network state, and commuters have heterogeneous access to information regarding the state. The framework enables modeling of commuters’ private beliefs of the network state and of the other commuters. We conduct equilibrium analysis of Bayesian congestion games under a range of information structures introduced by navigation applications. Our results suggest that access to information reduces costs to individual informed commuters, but the relative value of information can be zero (or even negative) if many commuters are highly informed. Moreover, there exists a fraction of informed commuters above which the aggregate social cost may increase.

Data Science for Pay-Per-Mile Car Insurance, Sep 16

1 hour 9 min ago
In this talk, we will provide an overview of pay-per-mile car insurance, a type of usage-based insurance policy where a driver's rate variably changes with mileage. We will then discuss several of the data science challenges that go along with implementing a pay-per-mile application, including OBD-II data collection/processing, map matching, and activity detection. We will also highlight some recent work on deep learning for driving detection on mobile phones.

The Timing of Land Redevelopment Around BRT, Sep 23

1 hour 9 min ago
Although there is increasing evidence about the effects of bus rapid transit on land development, little is known about when that development occurs. In this presentation I will focus on a joint study that examines the timing of land market changes give the introduction of a BRT line in Bogotá, Colombia. We use a before-and-after research design with controls to understand parcel-level land use changes along a corridor with the BRT investment relative to a corridor without it. Specifically, we examine, separately, changes to residential land use and to commercial land use. We use propensity-score weighted hazard regression models to examine the time-until land use changes at the parcel level while controlling for neighborhood and parcel characteristics. The land use change hazard is modeled semi-parametrically using time dummies. Results suggest that parcel conversions to residential uses on corridors with BRT are lower than in corridors without BRT, and increasingly so over time. By contrast, parcel conversions to commercial uses are higher over time and at an increasing rate along the BRT corridor. Despite these overall results, we found significant heterogeneity across corridors, which point to the importance of real estate submarkets. Understanding the timing of land market changes after the introduction of BRT is important for characterizing neighborhood change, for planning development and redevelopment around stops, and for structuring land-based financing mechanisms of transportation investments.

Low Car(bon) Communities: Inspiring car-free and car-lite urban futures, Sep 30

1 hour 9 min ago
With increasing awareness of the urgent need to respond to global warming by reducing carbon emissions and recognition of the social benefits of car-free and car-lite living, more and more city planners, advocates, and everyday urban dwellers are demanding new ways of building cities. In Low Car(bon) Communities, authors Nicole Foletta and Jason Henderson examine seven case studies in Europe and the United States that aim explicitly to reduce dependency on cars. Innovative and inspirational, these communities provide a rich array of data and metrics for comparison and analysis. This book considers these low car(bon) communities’ potential for transferability to cities around the world, including North America. In this seminar, Nicole will discuss highlights from the seven case studies in the book and will present lessons learned and applications for US cities.

Big data, the fundamental relationship, and loop detectors- achieving precision out of a blunt instrument by asking the right questions of the data, Oct 7

1 hour 9 min ago
On the surface, this talk will discuss subtle empirical nuances of the fundamental relationship of traffic flow and how these nuances were discovered via an unexpected source. In the broader context, this talk will present the challenge of questioning universally held assumptions to find far-reaching answers hiding in plain sight.

People rarely question the first things they learn, and so you never have a second chance to make the first impression. Within the traffic flow domain, few stop to question how empirical vehicle data were aggregated, or even what should be measured in the first place. So while many seek to build higher order cathedrals to model traffic flow, they do not realize they are doing so on a shaky foundation of inappropriate data aggregation that was arbitrarily chosen generations ago.

After setting the context, this talk will seek to ask the right questions of empirical loop detector data in search of deeper insights. While everyone knows that loop detector data are a noisy mess (a blunt instrument at best), this work used big data and a new approach to reveal remarkably clean emergent relationships from the very same loop detector data. By asking the right questions, the relatively simple technique is able to uncover important dependencies that are absent from contemporary traffic flow models. This process of setting aside commonly held assumptions and carefully asking the right questions of the raw data is something that transcends any specific discipline or topic area.

Data Visualization, Oct 12

1 hour 9 min ago
A well-designed figure can have a huge impact on the communication of research results. This workshop will introduce key principles and resources for visualizing data:

- Choosing when to use a visualization
- Selecting the best visualization type for your data
- Choosing design elements that increase clarity and impact
- Avoiding visualization issues that obscure or distort data
- Finding tools for generating visualizations
- Using geospatial visualization tools effectively

PL-11 Complete Streets Planning and Design, Jun 15-16

June 16, 2016 - 10:43pm
Complete Streets are planned, designed, operated, and maintained to provide safe and comfortable travel for all users of all ages. Complete Streets provide for all modes of transportation, including pedestrians, bicyclists, transit vehicles, and motorists, as well as allow for emergency response, road maintenance, and goods movement. This course covers the planning and design of Complete Streets, including the history of Complete Streets; the policy environment for Complete Streets, particularly in the California legislative environment; how to integrate Complete Streets with the urban planning process; and how to design streets, intersections, crossings, and interchanges consistent with the Complete Streets approach.

AV-12 Airport Systems Planning and Design (45th Annual Short Course), Jun 13-16

June 16, 2016 - 10:43pm
The course is being offered in association with the National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research. This four-day course covers the broad spectrum of airport planning and design issues within the evolving context of the air transportation industry. It provides an introduction to issues that arise in planning airport systems and the development of new and existing airports, as well as the design of airport facilities to handle both aircraft and passenger demand. These issues are examined in the context of recent trends in airline service, fuel costs, industry structure and evolving efforts to address climate change and sustainability. The course provides an opportunity to explore these issues with experts from different segments of the industry. The topics covered range from airport and airline economics and travel demand forecasting to airport capacity analysis, noise analysis, and environmental planning. Airfield design, passenger processing, and airport ground access are also discussed. The past fifteen years have been a period of great turmoil in the airline industry. Following a decade of fairly steady growth in air travel and air cargo demand that resulted in then-record levels of air traffic in 2000, a slowdown in economic growth starting in 2001 together with the terrorist attacks of September 11 and the impacts of the resulting security measures led to a steep decline in air travel. As a result of significantly improved airport security and a rebounding economy, the growth in air travel resumed as the decade progressed and by 2005 air traffic had exceeded pre-September 11 levels. Over the next two years air traffic continued to grow and most airlines were again able to achieve profitability. Industry trends showed a continued growth of low-cost carriers, the expanded use of regional jets in markets previously served by larger aircraft, and increased point-to-point service. As a result, airports were again experiencing increased congestion and delays.Then oil prices soared, driving up the cost of aviation fuel and wiping out the gains in airline profitability, quickly followed by a collapse of the financial markets and a severe recession. Since mid-2012 , the economy has been continuing a slow recovery from this recession, although air travel has not yet returned to pre-recession levels, in part due to higher air fares as airlines struggle to achieve profitability in the face of high fuel prices. However, future air traffic growth is forecast to reach traffic levels that exceed the previous peak by 2015 and to continue growing thereafter, presenting new challenges for those involved in airport planning and design. Complicating this situation are growing pressures to respond to longer term concerns about climate change and sustainability.

AV-12 Airport Systems Planning and Design (45th Annual Short Course), Jun 13-16

June 15, 2016 - 10:38pm
The course is being offered in association with the National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research. This four-day course covers the broad spectrum of airport planning and design issues within the evolving context of the air transportation industry. It provides an introduction to issues that arise in planning airport systems and the development of new and existing airports, as well as the design of airport facilities to handle both aircraft and passenger demand. These issues are examined in the context of recent trends in airline service, fuel costs, industry structure and evolving efforts to address climate change and sustainability. The course provides an opportunity to explore these issues with experts from different segments of the industry. The topics covered range from airport and airline economics and travel demand forecasting to airport capacity analysis, noise analysis, and environmental planning. Airfield design, passenger processing, and airport ground access are also discussed. The past fifteen years have been a period of great turmoil in the airline industry. Following a decade of fairly steady growth in air travel and air cargo demand that resulted in then-record levels of air traffic in 2000, a slowdown in economic growth starting in 2001 together with the terrorist attacks of September 11 and the impacts of the resulting security measures led to a steep decline in air travel. As a result of significantly improved airport security and a rebounding economy, the growth in air travel resumed as the decade progressed and by 2005 air traffic had exceeded pre-September 11 levels. Over the next two years air traffic continued to grow and most airlines were again able to achieve profitability. Industry trends showed a continued growth of low-cost carriers, the expanded use of regional jets in markets previously served by larger aircraft, and increased point-to-point service. As a result, airports were again experiencing increased congestion and delays.Then oil prices soared, driving up the cost of aviation fuel and wiping out the gains in airline profitability, quickly followed by a collapse of the financial markets and a severe recession. Since mid-2012 , the economy has been continuing a slow recovery from this recession, although air travel has not yet returned to pre-recession levels, in part due to higher air fares as airlines struggle to achieve profitability in the face of high fuel prices. However, future air traffic growth is forecast to reach traffic levels that exceed the previous peak by 2015 and to continue growing thereafter, presenting new challenges for those involved in airport planning and design. Complicating this situation are growing pressures to respond to longer term concerns about climate change and sustainability.

PL-11 Complete Streets Planning and Design, Jun 15-16

June 15, 2016 - 10:38pm
Complete Streets are planned, designed, operated, and maintained to provide safe and comfortable travel for all users of all ages. Complete Streets provide for all modes of transportation, including pedestrians, bicyclists, transit vehicles, and motorists, as well as allow for emergency response, road maintenance, and goods movement. This course covers the planning and design of Complete Streets, including the history of Complete Streets; the policy environment for Complete Streets, particularly in the California legislative environment; how to integrate Complete Streets with the urban planning process; and how to design streets, intersections, crossings, and interchanges consistent with the Complete Streets approach.

AV-12 Airport Systems Planning and Design (45th Annual Short Course), Jun 13-16

June 14, 2016 - 10:42pm
The course is being offered in association with the National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research. This four-day course covers the broad spectrum of airport planning and design issues within the evolving context of the air transportation industry. It provides an introduction to issues that arise in planning airport systems and the development of new and existing airports, as well as the design of airport facilities to handle both aircraft and passenger demand. These issues are examined in the context of recent trends in airline service, fuel costs, industry structure and evolving efforts to address climate change and sustainability. The course provides an opportunity to explore these issues with experts from different segments of the industry. The topics covered range from airport and airline economics and travel demand forecasting to airport capacity analysis, noise analysis, and environmental planning. Airfield design, passenger processing, and airport ground access are also discussed. The past fifteen years have been a period of great turmoil in the airline industry. Following a decade of fairly steady growth in air travel and air cargo demand that resulted in then-record levels of air traffic in 2000, a slowdown in economic growth starting in 2001 together with the terrorist attacks of September 11 and the impacts of the resulting security measures led to a steep decline in air travel. As a result of significantly improved airport security and a rebounding economy, the growth in air travel resumed as the decade progressed and by 2005 air traffic had exceeded pre-September 11 levels. Over the next two years air traffic continued to grow and most airlines were again able to achieve profitability. Industry trends showed a continued growth of low-cost carriers, the expanded use of regional jets in markets previously served by larger aircraft, and increased point-to-point service. As a result, airports were again experiencing increased congestion and delays.Then oil prices soared, driving up the cost of aviation fuel and wiping out the gains in airline profitability, quickly followed by a collapse of the financial markets and a severe recession. Since mid-2012 , the economy has been continuing a slow recovery from this recession, although air travel has not yet returned to pre-recession levels, in part due to higher air fares as airlines struggle to achieve profitability in the face of high fuel prices. However, future air traffic growth is forecast to reach traffic levels that exceed the previous peak by 2015 and to continue growing thereafter, presenting new challenges for those involved in airport planning and design. Complicating this situation are growing pressures to respond to longer term concerns about climate change and sustainability.

AV-12 Airport Systems Planning and Design (45th Annual Short Course), Jun 13-16

June 13, 2016 - 11:36pm
The course is being offered in association with the National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research. This four-day course covers the broad spectrum of airport planning and design issues within the evolving context of the air transportation industry. It provides an introduction to issues that arise in planning airport systems and the development of new and existing airports, as well as the design of airport facilities to handle both aircraft and passenger demand. These issues are examined in the context of recent trends in airline service, fuel costs, industry structure and evolving efforts to address climate change and sustainability. The course provides an opportunity to explore these issues with experts from different segments of the industry. The topics covered range from airport and airline economics and travel demand forecasting to airport capacity analysis, noise analysis, and environmental planning. Airfield design, passenger processing, and airport ground access are also discussed. The past fifteen years have been a period of great turmoil in the airline industry. Following a decade of fairly steady growth in air travel and air cargo demand that resulted in then-record levels of air traffic in 2000, a slowdown in economic growth starting in 2001 together with the terrorist attacks of September 11 and the impacts of the resulting security measures led to a steep decline in air travel. As a result of significantly improved airport security and a rebounding economy, the growth in air travel resumed as the decade progressed and by 2005 air traffic had exceeded pre-September 11 levels. Over the next two years air traffic continued to grow and most airlines were again able to achieve profitability. Industry trends showed a continued growth of low-cost carriers, the expanded use of regional jets in markets previously served by larger aircraft, and increased point-to-point service. As a result, airports were again experiencing increased congestion and delays.Then oil prices soared, driving up the cost of aviation fuel and wiping out the gains in airline profitability, quickly followed by a collapse of the financial markets and a severe recession. Since mid-2012 , the economy has been continuing a slow recovery from this recession, although air travel has not yet returned to pre-recession levels, in part due to higher air fares as airlines struggle to achieve profitability in the face of high fuel prices. However, future air traffic growth is forecast to reach traffic levels that exceed the previous peak by 2015 and to continue growing thereafter, presenting new challenges for those involved in airport planning and design. Complicating this situation are growing pressures to respond to longer term concerns about climate change and sustainability.

TE-41 Traffic Signal Design: Complete Streets Application, Jun 6-7

June 7, 2016 - 11:40pm
This new course introduces the practical design considerations in traffic signal designs that are above and beyond the basic introductions. Within the framework of the California Vehicle Code, the California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (CA MUTCD), and other national and state references with recommended practices and real-world illustrations, this course will explore the multi-modal design expectations from today's traffic signal designers in a complete-street environment.

This course will introduce complex signal phasing diagrams, typical features of controller firmware, and configuration of signal cabinets; and signal indications/heads placement and detection layout with respect to design applications for rail crossings, emergency vehicles, bus transit, bicycles, pedestrians, and cars. Additionally, this course will introduce the design concept for bus rapid transit (BRT), light rail transit (LRT) and heavy rail.

The course includes lectures, sample problems, and exercise projects that will familiarize the course participant with the design process that starts with preliminary and progress design submittals, as well as formats of design review comments and resolutions expected by typical public agencies. While this course is suitable for traffic signal designers with varying experience, this course will be introduced as a sequential next-level course to Tech Transfer's TE-02 (Traffic Signal Design: Engineering Concepts), or equivalent. The goal is for the course participants to become familiar with real-world, multi-modal, signal-design applications that accommodate various street types and intersections users.

TE-41 Traffic Signal Design: Complete Streets Application, Jun 6-7

June 6, 2016 - 10:37pm
This new course introduces the practical design considerations in traffic signal designs that are above and beyond the basic introductions. Within the framework of the California Vehicle Code, the California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (CA MUTCD), and other national and state references with recommended practices and real-world illustrations, this course will explore the multi-modal design expectations from today's traffic signal designers in a complete-street environment.

This course will introduce complex signal phasing diagrams, typical features of controller firmware, and configuration of signal cabinets; and signal indications/heads placement and detection layout with respect to design applications for rail crossings, emergency vehicles, bus transit, bicycles, pedestrians, and cars. Additionally, this course will introduce the design concept for bus rapid transit (BRT), light rail transit (LRT) and heavy rail.

The course includes lectures, sample problems, and exercise projects that will familiarize the course participant with the design process that starts with preliminary and progress design submittals, as well as formats of design review comments and resolutions expected by typical public agencies. While this course is suitable for traffic signal designers with varying experience, this course will be introduced as a sequential next-level course to Tech Transfer's TE-02 (Traffic Signal Design: Engineering Concepts), or equivalent. The goal is for the course participants to become familiar with real-world, multi-modal, signal-design applications that accommodate various street types and intersections users.

IDM-27 Superpave Mix Design for Local Agencies, May 24-26

May 26, 2016 - 11:31pm
The SUPERPAVE mix design method is designed to replace the Hveem method. California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) started implementing the national SUPERPAVE standard for designing, specifying, and accepting pavement projects for all state jobs. The new mix design accounts for traffic loading and environmental conditions and includes a new method of evaluating the asphalt mixture. This course provides an overview of the SUPERPAVE mix design for local agencies and adjustments needed to start transitioning to the new mix design.

IDM-27 Superpave Mix Design for Local Agencies, May 24-26

May 25, 2016 - 10:56pm
The SUPERPAVE mix design method is designed to replace the Hveem method. California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) started implementing the national SUPERPAVE standard for designing, specifying, and accepting pavement projects for all state jobs. The new mix design accounts for traffic loading and environmental conditions and includes a new method of evaluating the asphalt mixture. This course provides an overview of the SUPERPAVE mix design for local agencies and adjustments needed to start transitioning to the new mix design.

IDM-27 Superpave Mix Design for Local Agencies, May 24-26

May 24, 2016 - 10:53pm
The SUPERPAVE mix design method is designed to replace the Hveem method. California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) started implementing the national SUPERPAVE standard for designing, specifying, and accepting pavement projects for all state jobs. The new mix design accounts for traffic loading and environmental conditions and includes a new method of evaluating the asphalt mixture. This course provides an overview of the SUPERPAVE mix design for local agencies and adjustments needed to start transitioning to the new mix design.

PL-02 Funding and Programming Transportation Projects in California, May 19-20

May 20, 2016 - 11:36pm
Funding state and local highway projects in California has become a complex process involving multiple inter-related federal, state, regional, and local planning and operating agencies as well as an alphabet soup of documents and funding programs. The process is further complicated by changing requirements and shifting political priorities. Without a map and a strategy for developing fundable projects, public agencies risk losing funding opportunities. This course explains how the process works in the "real world" and provides planners, project managers and grant managers with guidelines for thinking strategically as they develop fiscal plans, programs, and project descriptions.

PL-02 Funding and Programming Transportation Projects in California, May 19-20

May 19, 2016 - 10:51pm
Funding state and local highway projects in California has become a complex process involving multiple inter-related federal, state, regional, and local planning and operating agencies as well as an alphabet soup of documents and funding programs. The process is further complicated by changing requirements and shifting political priorities. Without a map and a strategy for developing fundable projects, public agencies risk losing funding opportunities. This course explains how the process works in the "real world" and provides planners, project managers and grant managers with guidelines for thinking strategically as they develop fiscal plans, programs, and project descriptions.

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Student Symposium, May 17

May 17, 2016 - 11:52pm
A Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Student Symposium for California graduate students is being held as part of the annual meeting of the International Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells in the Economy (IPHE). Dignitaries from around the world will gather to
discuss the latest advances in fuel cell and hydrogen (FCH) technologies, commercialization initiatives, and opportunities for international collaboration.

The meeting will offer attendees the opportunity to learn about the role of FCH technologies and the growing market for FCH applications, understand the needs and opportunities in the associated workforce, and directly engage with leaders in the
academic, government and private sectors through a series of small-table discussions. Students from applied sciences, engineering, business, policy, marketing, and public affairs are encouraged to attend.
Students from California and other universities are invited to attend by RSVP using the link below. The program will include:
1. An overview of the latest hydrogen/fuel cell technology status
2. California university educational and training programs
3. Industry representatives discussing employment opportunities
4. Remaining challenges and policy developments

We hope you can join us for a provocative afternoon of discussion, small-group interactive sessions, displays, and Q&A about the latest FCH technologies with leading experts!
For more information contact: Michael Mills (michael.mills@ee.doe.gov)

Please RSVP through the “Education and Outreach Event” link at: http://iphe.net

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy