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PL-11 Complete Streets Planning and Design, Jun 15-16

June 16, 2016 - 10:43pm
Complete Streets are planned, designed, operated, and maintained to provide safe and comfortable travel for all users of all ages. Complete Streets provide for all modes of transportation, including pedestrians, bicyclists, transit vehicles, and motorists, as well as allow for emergency response, road maintenance, and goods movement. This course covers the planning and design of Complete Streets, including the history of Complete Streets; the policy environment for Complete Streets, particularly in the California legislative environment; how to integrate Complete Streets with the urban planning process; and how to design streets, intersections, crossings, and interchanges consistent with the Complete Streets approach.

AV-12 Airport Systems Planning and Design (45th Annual Short Course), Jun 13-16

June 16, 2016 - 10:43pm
The course is being offered in association with the National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research. This four-day course covers the broad spectrum of airport planning and design issues within the evolving context of the air transportation industry. It provides an introduction to issues that arise in planning airport systems and the development of new and existing airports, as well as the design of airport facilities to handle both aircraft and passenger demand. These issues are examined in the context of recent trends in airline service, fuel costs, industry structure and evolving efforts to address climate change and sustainability. The course provides an opportunity to explore these issues with experts from different segments of the industry. The topics covered range from airport and airline economics and travel demand forecasting to airport capacity analysis, noise analysis, and environmental planning. Airfield design, passenger processing, and airport ground access are also discussed. The past fifteen years have been a period of great turmoil in the airline industry. Following a decade of fairly steady growth in air travel and air cargo demand that resulted in then-record levels of air traffic in 2000, a slowdown in economic growth starting in 2001 together with the terrorist attacks of September 11 and the impacts of the resulting security measures led to a steep decline in air travel. As a result of significantly improved airport security and a rebounding economy, the growth in air travel resumed as the decade progressed and by 2005 air traffic had exceeded pre-September 11 levels. Over the next two years air traffic continued to grow and most airlines were again able to achieve profitability. Industry trends showed a continued growth of low-cost carriers, the expanded use of regional jets in markets previously served by larger aircraft, and increased point-to-point service. As a result, airports were again experiencing increased congestion and delays.Then oil prices soared, driving up the cost of aviation fuel and wiping out the gains in airline profitability, quickly followed by a collapse of the financial markets and a severe recession. Since mid-2012 , the economy has been continuing a slow recovery from this recession, although air travel has not yet returned to pre-recession levels, in part due to higher air fares as airlines struggle to achieve profitability in the face of high fuel prices. However, future air traffic growth is forecast to reach traffic levels that exceed the previous peak by 2015 and to continue growing thereafter, presenting new challenges for those involved in airport planning and design. Complicating this situation are growing pressures to respond to longer term concerns about climate change and sustainability.

AV-12 Airport Systems Planning and Design (45th Annual Short Course), Jun 13-16

June 15, 2016 - 10:38pm
The course is being offered in association with the National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research. This four-day course covers the broad spectrum of airport planning and design issues within the evolving context of the air transportation industry. It provides an introduction to issues that arise in planning airport systems and the development of new and existing airports, as well as the design of airport facilities to handle both aircraft and passenger demand. These issues are examined in the context of recent trends in airline service, fuel costs, industry structure and evolving efforts to address climate change and sustainability. The course provides an opportunity to explore these issues with experts from different segments of the industry. The topics covered range from airport and airline economics and travel demand forecasting to airport capacity analysis, noise analysis, and environmental planning. Airfield design, passenger processing, and airport ground access are also discussed. The past fifteen years have been a period of great turmoil in the airline industry. Following a decade of fairly steady growth in air travel and air cargo demand that resulted in then-record levels of air traffic in 2000, a slowdown in economic growth starting in 2001 together with the terrorist attacks of September 11 and the impacts of the resulting security measures led to a steep decline in air travel. As a result of significantly improved airport security and a rebounding economy, the growth in air travel resumed as the decade progressed and by 2005 air traffic had exceeded pre-September 11 levels. Over the next two years air traffic continued to grow and most airlines were again able to achieve profitability. Industry trends showed a continued growth of low-cost carriers, the expanded use of regional jets in markets previously served by larger aircraft, and increased point-to-point service. As a result, airports were again experiencing increased congestion and delays.Then oil prices soared, driving up the cost of aviation fuel and wiping out the gains in airline profitability, quickly followed by a collapse of the financial markets and a severe recession. Since mid-2012 , the economy has been continuing a slow recovery from this recession, although air travel has not yet returned to pre-recession levels, in part due to higher air fares as airlines struggle to achieve profitability in the face of high fuel prices. However, future air traffic growth is forecast to reach traffic levels that exceed the previous peak by 2015 and to continue growing thereafter, presenting new challenges for those involved in airport planning and design. Complicating this situation are growing pressures to respond to longer term concerns about climate change and sustainability.

PL-11 Complete Streets Planning and Design, Jun 15-16

June 15, 2016 - 10:38pm
Complete Streets are planned, designed, operated, and maintained to provide safe and comfortable travel for all users of all ages. Complete Streets provide for all modes of transportation, including pedestrians, bicyclists, transit vehicles, and motorists, as well as allow for emergency response, road maintenance, and goods movement. This course covers the planning and design of Complete Streets, including the history of Complete Streets; the policy environment for Complete Streets, particularly in the California legislative environment; how to integrate Complete Streets with the urban planning process; and how to design streets, intersections, crossings, and interchanges consistent with the Complete Streets approach.

AV-12 Airport Systems Planning and Design (45th Annual Short Course), Jun 13-16

June 14, 2016 - 10:42pm
The course is being offered in association with the National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research. This four-day course covers the broad spectrum of airport planning and design issues within the evolving context of the air transportation industry. It provides an introduction to issues that arise in planning airport systems and the development of new and existing airports, as well as the design of airport facilities to handle both aircraft and passenger demand. These issues are examined in the context of recent trends in airline service, fuel costs, industry structure and evolving efforts to address climate change and sustainability. The course provides an opportunity to explore these issues with experts from different segments of the industry. The topics covered range from airport and airline economics and travel demand forecasting to airport capacity analysis, noise analysis, and environmental planning. Airfield design, passenger processing, and airport ground access are also discussed. The past fifteen years have been a period of great turmoil in the airline industry. Following a decade of fairly steady growth in air travel and air cargo demand that resulted in then-record levels of air traffic in 2000, a slowdown in economic growth starting in 2001 together with the terrorist attacks of September 11 and the impacts of the resulting security measures led to a steep decline in air travel. As a result of significantly improved airport security and a rebounding economy, the growth in air travel resumed as the decade progressed and by 2005 air traffic had exceeded pre-September 11 levels. Over the next two years air traffic continued to grow and most airlines were again able to achieve profitability. Industry trends showed a continued growth of low-cost carriers, the expanded use of regional jets in markets previously served by larger aircraft, and increased point-to-point service. As a result, airports were again experiencing increased congestion and delays.Then oil prices soared, driving up the cost of aviation fuel and wiping out the gains in airline profitability, quickly followed by a collapse of the financial markets and a severe recession. Since mid-2012 , the economy has been continuing a slow recovery from this recession, although air travel has not yet returned to pre-recession levels, in part due to higher air fares as airlines struggle to achieve profitability in the face of high fuel prices. However, future air traffic growth is forecast to reach traffic levels that exceed the previous peak by 2015 and to continue growing thereafter, presenting new challenges for those involved in airport planning and design. Complicating this situation are growing pressures to respond to longer term concerns about climate change and sustainability.

AV-12 Airport Systems Planning and Design (45th Annual Short Course), Jun 13-16

June 13, 2016 - 11:36pm
The course is being offered in association with the National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research. This four-day course covers the broad spectrum of airport planning and design issues within the evolving context of the air transportation industry. It provides an introduction to issues that arise in planning airport systems and the development of new and existing airports, as well as the design of airport facilities to handle both aircraft and passenger demand. These issues are examined in the context of recent trends in airline service, fuel costs, industry structure and evolving efforts to address climate change and sustainability. The course provides an opportunity to explore these issues with experts from different segments of the industry. The topics covered range from airport and airline economics and travel demand forecasting to airport capacity analysis, noise analysis, and environmental planning. Airfield design, passenger processing, and airport ground access are also discussed. The past fifteen years have been a period of great turmoil in the airline industry. Following a decade of fairly steady growth in air travel and air cargo demand that resulted in then-record levels of air traffic in 2000, a slowdown in economic growth starting in 2001 together with the terrorist attacks of September 11 and the impacts of the resulting security measures led to a steep decline in air travel. As a result of significantly improved airport security and a rebounding economy, the growth in air travel resumed as the decade progressed and by 2005 air traffic had exceeded pre-September 11 levels. Over the next two years air traffic continued to grow and most airlines were again able to achieve profitability. Industry trends showed a continued growth of low-cost carriers, the expanded use of regional jets in markets previously served by larger aircraft, and increased point-to-point service. As a result, airports were again experiencing increased congestion and delays.Then oil prices soared, driving up the cost of aviation fuel and wiping out the gains in airline profitability, quickly followed by a collapse of the financial markets and a severe recession. Since mid-2012 , the economy has been continuing a slow recovery from this recession, although air travel has not yet returned to pre-recession levels, in part due to higher air fares as airlines struggle to achieve profitability in the face of high fuel prices. However, future air traffic growth is forecast to reach traffic levels that exceed the previous peak by 2015 and to continue growing thereafter, presenting new challenges for those involved in airport planning and design. Complicating this situation are growing pressures to respond to longer term concerns about climate change and sustainability.

TE-41 Traffic Signal Design: Complete Streets Application, Jun 6-7

June 7, 2016 - 11:40pm
This new course introduces the practical design considerations in traffic signal designs that are above and beyond the basic introductions. Within the framework of the California Vehicle Code, the California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (CA MUTCD), and other national and state references with recommended practices and real-world illustrations, this course will explore the multi-modal design expectations from today's traffic signal designers in a complete-street environment.

This course will introduce complex signal phasing diagrams, typical features of controller firmware, and configuration of signal cabinets; and signal indications/heads placement and detection layout with respect to design applications for rail crossings, emergency vehicles, bus transit, bicycles, pedestrians, and cars. Additionally, this course will introduce the design concept for bus rapid transit (BRT), light rail transit (LRT) and heavy rail.

The course includes lectures, sample problems, and exercise projects that will familiarize the course participant with the design process that starts with preliminary and progress design submittals, as well as formats of design review comments and resolutions expected by typical public agencies. While this course is suitable for traffic signal designers with varying experience, this course will be introduced as a sequential next-level course to Tech Transfer's TE-02 (Traffic Signal Design: Engineering Concepts), or equivalent. The goal is for the course participants to become familiar with real-world, multi-modal, signal-design applications that accommodate various street types and intersections users.

TE-41 Traffic Signal Design: Complete Streets Application, Jun 6-7

June 6, 2016 - 10:37pm
This new course introduces the practical design considerations in traffic signal designs that are above and beyond the basic introductions. Within the framework of the California Vehicle Code, the California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (CA MUTCD), and other national and state references with recommended practices and real-world illustrations, this course will explore the multi-modal design expectations from today's traffic signal designers in a complete-street environment.

This course will introduce complex signal phasing diagrams, typical features of controller firmware, and configuration of signal cabinets; and signal indications/heads placement and detection layout with respect to design applications for rail crossings, emergency vehicles, bus transit, bicycles, pedestrians, and cars. Additionally, this course will introduce the design concept for bus rapid transit (BRT), light rail transit (LRT) and heavy rail.

The course includes lectures, sample problems, and exercise projects that will familiarize the course participant with the design process that starts with preliminary and progress design submittals, as well as formats of design review comments and resolutions expected by typical public agencies. While this course is suitable for traffic signal designers with varying experience, this course will be introduced as a sequential next-level course to Tech Transfer's TE-02 (Traffic Signal Design: Engineering Concepts), or equivalent. The goal is for the course participants to become familiar with real-world, multi-modal, signal-design applications that accommodate various street types and intersections users.

IDM-27 Superpave Mix Design for Local Agencies, May 24-26

May 26, 2016 - 11:31pm
The SUPERPAVE mix design method is designed to replace the Hveem method. California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) started implementing the national SUPERPAVE standard for designing, specifying, and accepting pavement projects for all state jobs. The new mix design accounts for traffic loading and environmental conditions and includes a new method of evaluating the asphalt mixture. This course provides an overview of the SUPERPAVE mix design for local agencies and adjustments needed to start transitioning to the new mix design.

IDM-27 Superpave Mix Design for Local Agencies, May 24-26

May 25, 2016 - 10:56pm
The SUPERPAVE mix design method is designed to replace the Hveem method. California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) started implementing the national SUPERPAVE standard for designing, specifying, and accepting pavement projects for all state jobs. The new mix design accounts for traffic loading and environmental conditions and includes a new method of evaluating the asphalt mixture. This course provides an overview of the SUPERPAVE mix design for local agencies and adjustments needed to start transitioning to the new mix design.

IDM-27 Superpave Mix Design for Local Agencies, May 24-26

May 24, 2016 - 10:53pm
The SUPERPAVE mix design method is designed to replace the Hveem method. California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) started implementing the national SUPERPAVE standard for designing, specifying, and accepting pavement projects for all state jobs. The new mix design accounts for traffic loading and environmental conditions and includes a new method of evaluating the asphalt mixture. This course provides an overview of the SUPERPAVE mix design for local agencies and adjustments needed to start transitioning to the new mix design.

PL-02 Funding and Programming Transportation Projects in California, May 19-20

May 20, 2016 - 11:36pm
Funding state and local highway projects in California has become a complex process involving multiple inter-related federal, state, regional, and local planning and operating agencies as well as an alphabet soup of documents and funding programs. The process is further complicated by changing requirements and shifting political priorities. Without a map and a strategy for developing fundable projects, public agencies risk losing funding opportunities. This course explains how the process works in the "real world" and provides planners, project managers and grant managers with guidelines for thinking strategically as they develop fiscal plans, programs, and project descriptions.

PL-02 Funding and Programming Transportation Projects in California, May 19-20

May 19, 2016 - 10:51pm
Funding state and local highway projects in California has become a complex process involving multiple inter-related federal, state, regional, and local planning and operating agencies as well as an alphabet soup of documents and funding programs. The process is further complicated by changing requirements and shifting political priorities. Without a map and a strategy for developing fundable projects, public agencies risk losing funding opportunities. This course explains how the process works in the "real world" and provides planners, project managers and grant managers with guidelines for thinking strategically as they develop fiscal plans, programs, and project descriptions.

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Student Symposium, May 17

May 17, 2016 - 11:52pm
A Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Student Symposium for California graduate students is being held as part of the annual meeting of the International Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells in the Economy (IPHE). Dignitaries from around the world will gather to
discuss the latest advances in fuel cell and hydrogen (FCH) technologies, commercialization initiatives, and opportunities for international collaboration.

The meeting will offer attendees the opportunity to learn about the role of FCH technologies and the growing market for FCH applications, understand the needs and opportunities in the associated workforce, and directly engage with leaders in the
academic, government and private sectors through a series of small-table discussions. Students from applied sciences, engineering, business, policy, marketing, and public affairs are encouraged to attend.
Students from California and other universities are invited to attend by RSVP using the link below. The program will include:
1. An overview of the latest hydrogen/fuel cell technology status
2. California university educational and training programs
3. Industry representatives discussing employment opportunities
4. Remaining challenges and policy developments

We hope you can join us for a provocative afternoon of discussion, small-group interactive sessions, displays, and Q&A about the latest FCH technologies with leading experts!
For more information contact: Michael Mills (michael.mills@ee.doe.gov)

Please RSVP through the “Education and Outreach Event” link at: http://iphe.net

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy

Hierarchical Urban Transit System Design for Optimizing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Costs, May 13

May 13, 2016 - 11:45pm
In recent decades, public transportation’s role in mitigating climate change has received more attention. However, many current transit systems are not designed to reduce environmental impacts. In the U.S., the average energy intensity of transit buses is even higher than passenger cars due to the current low ridership rate of transit buses. This motivates our study of the benefits of design and operational approaches for reducing the environmental impacts of transit systems. One potential approach to reducing transit emissions is through lowering the operational frequency and spatial coverage, i.e., the transit level of service (LOS). By using the continuum approximation method, we quantify the emissions saved when reducing the transit LOS in various city scenarios. We also study the unintended situations where the lowered transit LOS results in more city-wide emissions because some transit users may not tolerate the service and will switch to faster modes, such as private automobiles. The analysis is based on a transit system with a hierarchical structure (trunk and feeder lines) providing service to a city where demand is elastic. By considering the interactions between the trunk and the feeder systems, we provide a quantitative basis for designing and operating integrated urban transit systems that can reduce GHG emissions and societal costs. A case study of the MUNI bus network for the city of San Francisco is also included in the presentation.

Bio:
Han Cheng is a Ph.D. candidate in Civil and Environmental Engineering at University of California, Berkeley. He received his masters degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 2014, and his two bachelor degrees in Civil Engineering and Economics from Tsinghua University in 2013. His research interest lies in transportation infrastructure management and network optimization considering multi-objectives from economic and environmental perspectives.

TE-10 Traffic Signal Operations: Advanced Applications, May 11-12

May 12, 2016 - 11:44pm
This two-day course focusing on advanced signal operations topics, will enable you to develop and evaluate performance of two types of traffic signal coordination -- time of day and traffic responsive systems. This course also introduces the advanced traffic adaptive system. For time of day and traffic responsive systems, attendees learn how to determine good timing and coordinated solutions with innovative approaches for managing vehicle queues, turns, and potential gridlock situations, how to find optimal timing solutions, and how to safely accommodate non-motorists. Students will work on signal timing plans using several signals along arterials including freeway interchange signals; assess whether more complex timing solutions offer operational improvements; solve specialized problems such as offset intersections and diamond interchanges; and learn to perform analysis and evaluation of traffic volumes and field checks. The operational concept for traffic adaptive systems will be introduced and results compared with results from the time of day and traffic responsive plans. A basic knowledge of SYNCHRO is helpful.

TE-10 Traffic Signal Operations: Advanced Applications, May 11-12

May 11, 2016 - 10:52pm
This two-day course focusing on advanced signal operations topics, will enable you to develop and evaluate performance of two types of traffic signal coordination -- time of day and traffic responsive systems. This course also introduces the advanced traffic adaptive system. For time of day and traffic responsive systems, attendees learn how to determine good timing and coordinated solutions with innovative approaches for managing vehicle queues, turns, and potential gridlock situations, how to find optimal timing solutions, and how to safely accommodate non-motorists. Students will work on signal timing plans using several signals along arterials including freeway interchange signals; assess whether more complex timing solutions offer operational improvements; solve specialized problems such as offset intersections and diamond interchanges; and learn to perform analysis and evaluation of traffic volumes and field checks. The operational concept for traffic adaptive systems will be introduced and results compared with results from the time of day and traffic responsive plans. A basic knowledge of SYNCHRO is helpful.

PL-58 Managing Transportation and Land Use Interactions, May 3-6

May 6, 2016 - 11:46pm
Transportation networks are one of the most powerful influences of local land use patterns. Local land use decisions shape the demand for transportation services and improvements. Managing this interaction to achieve multiple goals is one of the more difficult problems for planners and engineers. This new online course covers how to create successful plans and projects, how to address land use and transportation as an integrated system, how land use and transportation goals are changing the way we approach traffic management, , including how to identify key feedback relationships in your community; how to develop alternatives that balance competing goals and increase choice; and how to communicate the interactive nature of transportation and land use investments to decision-makers.

PL-58 Managing Transportation and Land Use Interactions, May 3-6

May 5, 2016 - 11:52pm
Transportation networks are one of the most powerful influences of local land use patterns. Local land use decisions shape the demand for transportation services and improvements. Managing this interaction to achieve multiple goals is one of the more difficult problems for planners and engineers. This new online course covers how to create successful plans and projects, how to address land use and transportation as an integrated system, how land use and transportation goals are changing the way we approach traffic management, , including how to identify key feedback relationships in your community; how to develop alternatives that balance competing goals and increase choice; and how to communicate the interactive nature of transportation and land use investments to decision-makers.

PL-58 Managing Transportation and Land Use Interactions, May 3-6

May 4, 2016 - 10:50pm
Transportation networks are one of the most powerful influences of local land use patterns. Local land use decisions shape the demand for transportation services and improvements. Managing this interaction to achieve multiple goals is one of the more difficult problems for planners and engineers. This new online course covers how to create successful plans and projects, how to address land use and transportation as an integrated system, how land use and transportation goals are changing the way we approach traffic management, , including how to identify key feedback relationships in your community; how to develop alternatives that balance competing goals and increase choice; and how to communicate the interactive nature of transportation and land use investments to decision-makers.