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Updated: 1 hour 54 min ago

Writing Specific Aims, Apr 13

April 13, 2017 - 11:34pm
This workshop will show you how to write succinct yet powerful specific aims for your research proposal. Your specific aims are the scaffold that holds your entire proposal together, and they can either grab a reviewer's attention or lose their interest completely. In this workshop, we will describe how to frame your specific aims to best support your research proposal.

Funding and Programming Transportation Projects in California, Apr 12-13

April 12, 2017 - 10:37pm
Funding state and local transportation projects in California is a complex process involving multiple inter-related federal, state, regional, and local planning and operating agencies, as well as an alphabet soup of documents and funding programs. Changing requirements and shifting political priorities can further complicate the process. Without a map and a strategy for developing fundable projects, public agencies and local governments risk losing funding opportunities. This course explains how the process works on the ground and provides planners, project managers, and grant managers with guidelines for thinking strategically as they develop fiscal plans, programs, and project descriptions.

EndNote Essentials:, Apr 11

April 11, 2017 - 11:37pm
EndNote is a citation management program that helps you organize the citations you find when doing research. It also lets you quickly insert these citations into your paper or report, converts them into any of thousands of different styles with a click or two, and creates a bibliography for you, saving hours of time when writing papers.

Bring your own laptop since you will practice some of the basic features in EndNote in this class. This training will include some hands-on learning.

During this workshop, we will cover the following topics:

* Adding references to EndNote from PubMed, Web of Science, and other databases
* Organizing your references into groups or folders
* Using EndNote with Microsoft Word to instantly add references to your document in any of 1000s of citations styles

Prior knowledge: Basic knowledge of your computer and Microsoft Word is required, but no prior experience with EndNote will be needed.

Technology requirement: Please bring your own laptop. Be sure that it has Microsoft Word loaded. You will also need to download the free trial version of EndNote (available at endnote.com) before class unless you already have this program.

Commercial Development Site Design and Traffic Impact Analysis, Apr 6-7

April 7, 2017 - 11:35pm
This new online course is about examining the key components that result in effective internal circulation for commercial land development projects. The course will also focus on why earlier designs have failed to provide good circulation and the resulting impacts on the tenants of shopping centers and business parks. It will discuss the problem of designing commercial development projects for safe access and minimizing traffic impacts on the neighboring roads. It will also discuss the preparation of traffic impact studies for new development projects to make sure impacts are properly addressed and cases studies of projects where studies failed to do so.

Airport Capacity Prediction Using Machine Learning and its Applications, Apr 7

April 7, 2017 - 11:35pm
Abstract: Air traffic managers and flight operators are faced with challenging decisions due to the uncertainty in capacity stemming from variability in weather, demand and human factors. Accurate airport capacity predictions are necessary to develop efficient decision-support tools for air traffic control and for planning effective traffic management initiatives. Capacity of an airport can be observed only at sufficiently large demand. However, if the throughput of an airport is limited by the demand, we can only conclude that the capacity is larger than or equal to the observed throughput. This inability to directly observe capacity makes capacity prediction a challenging and less explored problem.

This work applies machine-learning methods that incorporate observations censored by insufficient demand to develop an airport capacity prediction model. The model predicts a capacity distribution rather than a single capacity value for an hour of interest at an airport using its weather and scheduled demand data. We also discuss validation measures that account for the presence of censored observations. This work explores an important application of the estimated model: to develop capacity-based distance metric between two days using their predicted hourly capacity distributions. For a given reference day, the capacity-based distance can be used to identify similar historical days. The traffic management initiatives taken on past similar days and their resulting outcomes can augment controller experience to guide decision-making on the reference day at an airport.

Bio: Sreeta Gorripaty is a doctoral candidate in the Transportation Engineering program at UC Berkeley. Sreeta received her MS in Transportation Engineering at UC Berkeley and did her undergraduate in Civil Engineering from IIT Bombay. Her research focuses on applying machine learning and statistical methods to improve air traffic management and airport planning. Sreeta received the Graduate Research Award from Airport Cooperative Research Program in 2015 and also won Women's Transportation Seminar (WTS) Legacy Scholarship in 2015.

Commercial Development Site Design and Traffic Impact Analysis, Apr 6-7

April 6, 2017 - 11:34pm
This new online course is about examining the key components that result in effective internal circulation for commercial land development projects. The course will also focus on why earlier designs have failed to provide good circulation and the resulting impacts on the tenants of shopping centers and business parks. It will discuss the problem of designing commercial development projects for safe access and minimizing traffic impacts on the neighboring roads. It will also discuss the preparation of traffic impact studies for new development projects to make sure impacts are properly addressed and cases studies of projects where studies failed to do so.

ERG Colloquium: Nate Aden, Apr 5

April 5, 2017 - 11:33pm
As the primary means for growth and development over the past two centuries, industry has played a central role in generating our current Anthropocene. The increasing impacts of climate change bring the industrial sector to the fore as the largest emitter of greenhouse gases and as a potential manufacturer of transformational technologies and infrastructure. The U.S. industrial sector is emblematic of the deindustrializing strain of recent transformation: CO2 emissions dropped by 20% between 2000 and 2015, while the sector shed 5 million jobs and increased real value added by 14%. In this colloquium, Nate Aden presents his research on the drivers and components of U.S. industrial sector emissions mitigation. Beyond the U.S., the second focus is on the varied role of the industrial sector in the growing country-level decoupling of GDP and carbon emissions that has occurred since 2000. The resulting wrenching economic and social transitions, including employment churn and income redistribution, have sowed the conditions for populism—the final portion of the colloquium explores policy options for addressing the outcomes of industrial transformation.

Nate Aden has published on energy and climate for more than ten years. In addition to researching his Ph.D. with the Energy and Resources Group, Nate is also a Senior Fellow with the World Resources Institute. Prior to joining WRI, Nate conducted energy efficiency research with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Over five years with LBL, Nate’s projects were focused on energy efficiency policy, assessment of Chinese urban form energy use and emissions, Chinese energy data, China energy and climate scenario analysis, the coal sector, and the steel sector. Prior to LBL, Nate lived in Shanghai for 2 years, where he worked for the U.S. Consulate.

SEEDJAM Tech Expo 2017, Apr 5

April 5, 2017 - 11:33pm
Featured speakers include the Founders & CEO's of Postmates, Quora, Tanium, and Figma.

SEEDJAM is an annual exposition of all the innovative products coming out of startups at Berkeley and beyond. Every year exhibitors come to UC Berkeley to demonstrate the latest and greatest in technology.

View from the Top: Dan Rasky, Apr 5

April 5, 2017 - 11:33pm

Traffic Signal Design: Engineering Concepts, Mar 29-30

March 30, 2017 - 10:38pm
This newly updated course covers basic concepts, standards, and practices related to the design and installation of traffic signals. Within the framework of the California Vehicle Code, California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (CA MUTCD), and Chapter 9 on Highway Lighting from Caltrans Traffic Manual, this course will explore the relationship among various engineering disciplines as foundations for signal design; introduce signal phasing diagrams, signal controllers and cabinets; explain the layouts of signal heads, signal poles, conductor schedule, and associated signal conduits, pullboxes, wiring, interconnects, detection and safety lighting. The course includes lectures, sample problems, and exercise projects that will familiarize the course participant with the design process for a simple signal design plan, and to provide for a unit-price-based cost estimate. While this course will focus only on the introductory engineering aspects in signal design and introduce some local agencies' equivalent standards and specifications that vary from Caltrans, the goal is for the course participants to become familiar with standards and specifications that guide the design and lead to successful project delivery of an operational traffic signal.

Transit-Oriented Development: Putting it all Together, Mar 20-29

March 29, 2017 - 10:39pm
Transit-oriented development (TOD) has emerged as a powerful, effective way to integrate land use and public transit. TOD done right links smart growth and sustainability with higher capacity rail or bus transit services. This linkage takes place in the environs of the rail passenger station or the bus rapid transit stop. TOD concentrates workplaces, residences, and supporting retail services within convenient walking distance of rail or bus rapid transit service. In doing so, TOD brings customers to public transit services as well as creates vibrant, mixed-use communities. There are many challenges in creating successful TODs. These include building effective public-private partnerships, ensuring multi-modal TOD access for the "last mile" and beyond, "right-sizing parking", and balancing private and public uses to create a unique place identify.

Traffic Signal Design: Engineering Concepts, Mar 29-30

March 29, 2017 - 10:39pm
This newly updated course covers basic concepts, standards, and practices related to the design and installation of traffic signals. Within the framework of the California Vehicle Code, California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (CA MUTCD), and Chapter 9 on Highway Lighting from Caltrans Traffic Manual, this course will explore the relationship among various engineering disciplines as foundations for signal design; introduce signal phasing diagrams, signal controllers and cabinets; explain the layouts of signal heads, signal poles, conductor schedule, and associated signal conduits, pullboxes, wiring, interconnects, detection and safety lighting. The course includes lectures, sample problems, and exercise projects that will familiarize the course participant with the design process for a simple signal design plan, and to provide for a unit-price-based cost estimate. While this course will focus only on the introductory engineering aspects in signal design and introduce some local agencies' equivalent standards and specifications that vary from Caltrans, the goal is for the course participants to become familiar with standards and specifications that guide the design and lead to successful project delivery of an operational traffic signal.

Transit-Oriented Development: Putting it all Together, Mar 20-29

March 27, 2017 - 11:35pm
Transit-oriented development (TOD) has emerged as a powerful, effective way to integrate land use and public transit. TOD done right links smart growth and sustainability with higher capacity rail or bus transit services. This linkage takes place in the environs of the rail passenger station or the bus rapid transit stop. TOD concentrates workplaces, residences, and supporting retail services within convenient walking distance of rail or bus rapid transit service. In doing so, TOD brings customers to public transit services as well as creates vibrant, mixed-use communities. There are many challenges in creating successful TODs. These include building effective public-private partnerships, ensuring multi-modal TOD access for the "last mile" and beyond, "right-sizing parking", and balancing private and public uses to create a unique place identify.

Changing Fuel Loading Behavior to Improve Airline Fuel Efficiency, Mar 24

March 24, 2017 - 10:34pm
Abstract: Airlines rely on flight dispatchers to perform the duty of fuel planning. The required trip fuel is calculated by airlines’ Flight Planning Systems (FPS). However, the FPS trip fuel predictions are not always accurate. If planned trip fuel is higher than actual trip fuel, then a flight will waste fuel by carrying excess fuel weight. On the other hand, if trip fuel is under-estimated, then a flight might run into fuel emergency. In practice, dispatchers may also load contingency fuel to mitigate the risks of under-prediction. FPS also calculates recommended contingency fuel quantity for dispatchers called statistical contingency fuel (SCF). However, dispatchers will almost always load extra fuel above suggested SCF values. Therefore, airline fuel efficiency can be improved by more accurate fuel predictions, a deeper understanding of dispatchers’ fuel loading behavior, and more reliable SCF recommendations. Based on a large scale flight fuel loading dataset provided by a US major airline, an ensemble learning algorithm is proposed to improve fuel burn prediction. This method is found to reduce prediction error by over 50% compared to airline’s own predictions. By merging with a dispatcher survey, we are able to integrate dispatchers’ latent attributes into contingency fuel loading modeling. Furthermore, random quantile forests method will also be discussed in improving SCF recommendations. The benefit of improved fuel efficiency will be measured by estimating cost-to-carry reduced unnecessary fuel loading.

Bio: Lei Kang is a Ph.D. candidate of the Institute of Transportation Studies in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley. He received a Master of Arts degree in Biostatistics from the Division of Biostatistics at University of California, Berkeley. He also obtained his Master’s degree in Transportation and Infrastructure Systems Engineering from Purdue University. Lei's Bachelor’s degree is in Transportation Engineering from Tongji University in Shanghai, China. He is a member of the Committee on Airfield and Airspace Capacity and Delay, Transportation Research Board. His research interests are in the application of statistical methods and machine learning techniques to air traffic management and airline fuel loading decisions. He is also interested in causal inference in the area of traffic safety.

Inside NSF, Mar 23

March 23, 2017 - 11:47pm
This workshop will explain how NSF is structured, how it functions, and how it reviews proposals, with an eye towards how trends and federal policies affect its work. This session will help faculty apply an understanding of how NSF works to their funding strategies.

Transit-Oriented Development: Putting it all Together, Mar 20-29

March 22, 2017 - 10:42pm
Transit-oriented development (TOD) has emerged as a powerful, effective way to integrate land use and public transit. TOD done right links smart growth and sustainability with higher capacity rail or bus transit services. This linkage takes place in the environs of the rail passenger station or the bus rapid transit stop. TOD concentrates workplaces, residences, and supporting retail services within convenient walking distance of rail or bus rapid transit service. In doing so, TOD brings customers to public transit services as well as creates vibrant, mixed-use communities. There are many challenges in creating successful TODs. These include building effective public-private partnerships, ensuring multi-modal TOD access for the "last mile" and beyond, "right-sizing parking", and balancing private and public uses to create a unique place identify.

Transit-Oriented Development: Putting it all Together, Mar 20-29

March 20, 2017 - 10:40pm
Transit-oriented development (TOD) has emerged as a powerful, effective way to integrate land use and public transit. TOD done right links smart growth and sustainability with higher capacity rail or bus transit services. This linkage takes place in the environs of the rail passenger station or the bus rapid transit stop. TOD concentrates workplaces, residences, and supporting retail services within convenient walking distance of rail or bus rapid transit service. In doing so, TOD brings customers to public transit services as well as creates vibrant, mixed-use communities. There are many challenges in creating successful TODs. These include building effective public-private partnerships, ensuring multi-modal TOD access for the "last mile" and beyond, "right-sizing parking", and balancing private and public uses to create a unique place identify.

Bayesian Optimization and Self Driving Cars, Mar 17

March 17, 2017 - 10:38pm
Abstract: An important property of embedded learning systems is the ever-changing environment they create for all algorithms operating in the system. Optimizing the performance of those algorithms becomes a perpetual online activity rather than a one-off task. I will review some of these challenges in autonomous vehicles. I will discuss active optimization methods and their application in robotics and scientific applications, focusing on scaling up the dimensionality and managing multi-fidelity evaluations. I will finish with lessons learned and thoughts on future directions as we strive to bring autonomous vehicles into widespread use.

Bio: Dr. Jeff Schneider is the engineering lead for machine learning at Uber's Advanced Technologies Center. He is also a research professor in the Carnegie Mellon University School of Computer Science. He has 20 years experience developing, publishing, and applying machine learning algorithms in government, science, and industry. He has more than 100 publications and regularly gives talks and tutorials on the subject.

Geometric Design for California, Mar 14-16

March 16, 2017 - 11:38pm
This 3-day course covers the principles and best practices of roadway geometric design for various functional classes of roadways, including local streets, arterials and freeways, intersections and interchanges. This course focuses on practical, real world applications of geometric design methods. Developed with professionals in California in mind, the course will use design standards and guidelines in the Caltrans Highway Design Manual, the AASHTO "Greenbook," and other materials as appropriate. In addition to the geometric design focus, this course also addresses topics related to successful design and re-design practices in California, including stage construction, traffic handling, value analysis, context sensitive approach, owners to designers, etc. This fast-paced, hands-on course combines presentations, case-study examples, problem-solving and class exercises, with ample opportunity for networking and questions.

Pavement Management Systems and Preservation Strategies, Mar 15-16

March 16, 2017 - 11:38pm
Pavement networks are often the most valuable asset that an agency owns. This asset is not only expensive to replace, but it is an essential component to the traveling public's safety. Agencies are looking for more cost-effective ways to perform engineering, maintenance, management, and rehabilitation of roadways more than ever before to stretch funding allocations. A pavement management system is an essential tool to assist in cost-effective roadway maintenance planning.