Events

Syndicate content
Upcoming Events
Updated: 1 hour 6 min ago

California Transportation Planning Conference, Mar 3-5

March 4, 2017 - 12:39am
The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), in partnership with the Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS) at University of California, Berkeley present the: 2017 California Transportation Planning Conference, Partnering for Sustainable Transportation: Meeting the Challenge Now and Into the Future.

This three-day conference will provide attendees the opportunity to interact with transportation practitioners and decision-makers, exchange ideas and learn about emerging technologies and advancements in transportation planning from national, state, and local experts. The conference will focus on themes around sustainability and how we can partner to meet the challenges facing us now and into the future as required by California legislation and influenced by funding constraints.

ERG Colloquium: Andrew McAllister, Mar 1

March 2, 2017 - 12:38am
DESCRIPTION:
In the mid-2000's, California began to establish policy goals for Zero Net Energy (ZNE) buildings. Commissioner McAllister will discuss progress toward these goals in terms of energy-related building codes, trends in buildings-related technologies and markets, local government authority and overall energy systems planning. ZNE buildings serve as a jumping-off point for a broader discussion of California's movement toward distributed energy and decarbonization, including needs and opportunities for energy-savvy professionals and researchers.

BIO:
Andrew McAllister was appointed to the California Energy Commission by Gov. Edmund G. Brown in May 2012, and was reappointed in January 2017. He is lead commissioner for energy efficiency: energy-related building codes, appliance efficiency standards, existing building efficiency and a variety of other programmatic and financing initiatives across the state. He is heavily involved in implementation of several elements of SB 350 (de León, 2015), the Clean Energy and Pollution Reduction Act.

Commissioner McAllister has been working on clean energy deployment and policy for his entire 25-year career: beginning in the early 1990s in project engineering and development, evolving into program design and implementation, then moving into the policy arena. He has worked across the world to develop renewable energy generation, energy efficiency investments, and energy management systems, with counterparts ranging from tiny remote communities to the largest of utilities. He administered two of California’s signature renewable energy programs (California Solar Initiative, Self-Generation Incentive Program), developed and operated energy efficiency programs for utilities, and performed a broad range of policy-related research for California and the U.S. Federal government. He currently serves on the boards of directors of the National Association of State Energy Officials and the Alliance to Save Energy.

Before joining the Energy Commission, McAllister was managing director at the California Center for Sustainable Energy, where he worked for six years. Previously, he worked with NRECA International, Ltd. in the electric sectors of countries in Central and South America, Southeast Asia, and Africa on a variety of renewable generation, load management, utility planning and remote power projects. He was a project manager at an energy consulting firm and worked as an energy efficiency analyst at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Commissioner McAllister holds M.S. and PhD degrees from the Energy & Resources Group at UC Berkeley. He is a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer.

Multicopter Dynamics and Control: Surviving the complete loss of multiple actuators and quickly generating trajectories, Feb 24

February 24, 2017 - 11:40pm
Abstract: Flying robots, such as multicopters, are increasingly becoming part of our everyday lives, with current and future applications including personal transportation, delivery services, entertainment, and aerial sensing. These systems are expected to be safe and to have a high degree of autonomy. This talk will discuss the dynamics and control of multicopters, including some research results on trajectory generation for multicopters and fail-safe algorithms. We will also discuss the intersection of drones with personal transportation, and discuss some of the dominant scaling laws affecting the use of multicopters for personal transportation. Finally, we will present the application of a failsafe algorithm to a fleet of drones performing as part of a live theatre performance on New York's Broadway.

Bio: Mark W. Mueller joined the mechanical engineering department at UC Berkeley in September 2016. He completed his PhD studies, advised by Prof. Raffaello D'Andrea, at the Institute for Dynamic Systems and Control at the ETH Zurich at the end of 2015. He received a bachelors degree from the University of Pretoria, and a masters from the ETH Zurich in 2011, both in Mechanical Engineering.

Superpave Mix Design for Local Agencies, Feb 21-23

February 24, 2017 - 12:38am
The SUPERPAVE mix design method is designed to replace the Hveem method. California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) started implementing the national SUPERPAVE standard for designing, specifying, and accepting pavement projects for all state jobs. The new mix design accounts for traffic loading and environmental conditions and includes a new method of evaluating the asphalt mixture. This course provides an overview of the SUPERPAVE mix design for local agencies and adjustments needed to start transitioning to the new mix design.

NSF CAREER Workshop, Feb 23

February 24, 2017 - 12:38am
The NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is an NSF-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations. The CAREER Award program requires an integration of research and education activities beyond the scope of a regular NSF grant.

BRDO offers a free NSF CAREER Award Workshop for early career faculty each spring. This workshop provides information on NSF CAREER requirements and includes concrete suggestions on how to write a competitive proposal. A panel discussion with current CAREER awardees is a centerpiece of the workshop. Lunch will be provided. Registration required.

Superpave Mix Design for Local Agencies, Feb 21-23

February 22, 2017 - 11:37pm
The SUPERPAVE mix design method is designed to replace the Hveem method. California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) started implementing the national SUPERPAVE standard for designing, specifying, and accepting pavement projects for all state jobs. The new mix design accounts for traffic loading and environmental conditions and includes a new method of evaluating the asphalt mixture. This course provides an overview of the SUPERPAVE mix design for local agencies and adjustments needed to start transitioning to the new mix design.

Superpave Mix Design for Local Agencies, Feb 21-23

February 22, 2017 - 12:35am
The SUPERPAVE mix design method is designed to replace the Hveem method. California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) started implementing the national SUPERPAVE standard for designing, specifying, and accepting pavement projects for all state jobs. The new mix design accounts for traffic loading and environmental conditions and includes a new method of evaluating the asphalt mixture. This course provides an overview of the SUPERPAVE mix design for local agencies and adjustments needed to start transitioning to the new mix design.

Bending the Energy, Environmental, and Safety Curves Through Transportation Automation and Electrification, Feb 17

February 17, 2017 - 11:38pm
Abstract: The combination of vehicle automation and electrification has the potential to fundamentally change the transportation sector. Vehicle crashes, traffic congestion, air pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, energy consumption, and other negative externalities associated with driving could significantly diminish. However, travel may increase with these vehicles, pollution could be concentrated in new areas, and the life cycle impacts could become more important. Methods from engineering, economics, and policy sciences can inform stakeholders at the beginning of the transition to automation on maximizing the benefits and minimizing the challenges. This talk will present recent research on the implications of municipalities transitioning fleets to electric light-duty vehicles and eventual automation. The life cycle environmental, economic, and infrastructure outcomes will be presented, as well as the feasibility of coupling municipal vehicle travel with distributed solar energy. The talk will also highlight three recent research efforts in automation: the impact of automation on VMT from underserved populations, the social cost-effectiveness of early automation features, and the implications of automation on vehicle fuel economy testing and policy.

Bio: Costa Samaras is an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon. His research spans energy, climate change, automation, and defense analysis, and he teaches courses on energy analysis and climate adaptation for infrastructure. He has published studies examining electric and autonomous vehicles, infrastructure adaptation, and energy transitions. Costa directs the Carnegie Mellon Center for Engineering and Resilience for Climate Adaptation, and is an affiliated faculty member in the Traffic21 Research Center, the Scott Institute for Energy Innovation, and the Energy Science, Technology and Policy Program. He is also an Adjunct Senior Researcher at the RAND Corporation. Costa received a joint Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy and from Carnegie Mellon, a M.P.A. in Public Policy from New York University, and a B.S. from Bucknell University.

Traffic Signal Diagnostics and Maintenance, Feb 16

February 17, 2017 - 12:34am
This course covers the essential operational functions of traffic signals, starting with basic design principals and specifications writing techniques. Participants will see and touch each component inside a traffic signal cabinet, a thorough explanation of each component and how they work inside the cabinet. This critical knowledge of each component will provide the skillset necessary for proper diagnostic not just for technicians but also for engineers and signal maintenance managers. Participants will benefit from the instructor team's over sixty years of hands-on experience from both engineering and maintenance perspectives.

Coordinated Decentralized Optimal Control for Connected and Automated Vehicles, Feb 10

February 11, 2017 - 12:39am
Abstract: Recognition of the necessity for connecting vehicles to their surroundings is gaining momentum. In this “new world” of massive amounts of data from vehicles and infrastructure, what we used to model as uncertainty (noise or disturbance) for traffic becomes extra state information in a much higher-dimensional vector. Connected and automated vehicles provide the most intriguing opportunity for enabling users to better monitor transportation network conditions and make better operating decisions to improve safety and reduce pollution, energy consumption, and travel delays. While progress has been made, especially in the area of safety and how accidents could potentially be prevented, one particular question that still remains unanswered is, “How much can we improve fuel consumption, if we assume that the vehicles are connected and can exchange information with each other and with infrastructure?” This talk will address the problem of coordinating vehicles that are wirelessly connected to each other at different transportation segments such as, intersections and merging roadways to achieve a smooth traffic flow without stop-and-go driving. I will present a decentralized optimal control framework whose closed-form solution exists under certain conditions, and which, based on Hamiltonian analysis, yields for each vehicle the optimal acceleration/deceleration at any time in the sense of minimizing fuel consumption. The solution, when it exists, allows the vehicles to cross the intersections and merging roadways without the use of traffic lights, without creating congestion, and under the hard safety constraint of collision avoidance.

Bio: Andreas A. Malikopoulos is an Associate Professor in the department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Delaware. Previously he was the Deputy Director of the Urban Dynamics Institute with the Energy & Transportation Science Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Before joining ORNL, he was with General Motors Global Research & Development. He received a Diploma from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece, in 2000, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 2004 and 2008, respectively, all in Mechanical Engineering. His research interests span several fields, including analysis, optimization, and control of cyber-physical systems; decentralized stochastic systems; stochastic scheduling and resource allocation; and learning in complex systems. The emphasis is on applications related to energy, transportation and operations research. Andreas is the recipient of several prizes and awards, including the 2007 Dare to Dream Opportunity Grant from the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, the 2007 University of Michigan Teaching Fellow, and the 2010 Alvin M. Weinberg Fellowship. He has been selected by the National Academy of Engineering to participate at the 2010 German-American Frontiers of Engineering (FOE) Symposium and organize a session in transportation at the 2016 European-American FOE Symposium. He has also been selected as a 2012 Kavli Frontiers of Science Scholar by the National Academy of Sciences.

Asphalt Pavement Materials, Design, Construction and Maintenance, Feb 7-9

February 10, 2017 - 12:39am
This three-day course is aimed at covering the full range of topics related to asphalt concrete pavements from materials and mix design to construction, maintenance, and rehabilitation. Asphalt concrete pavements are a vital part of an agency's assets and constitute about 90% of the local streets in California. The numerous topics in this class will be presented in sufficient detail to assist the local agency engineer when dealing with contractors, consultants, and specifications. It is expected that the information presented will be very useful to those that design, specify, and manage asphalt pavements.

Asphalt Pavement Materials, Design, Construction and Maintenance, Feb 7-9

February 9, 2017 - 12:34am
This three-day course is aimed at covering the full range of topics related to asphalt concrete pavements from materials and mix design to construction, maintenance, and rehabilitation. Asphalt concrete pavements are a vital part of an agency's assets and constitute about 90% of the local streets in California. The numerous topics in this class will be presented in sufficient detail to assist the local agency engineer when dealing with contractors, consultants, and specifications. It is expected that the information presented will be very useful to those that design, specify, and manage asphalt pavements.

Asphalt Pavement Materials, Design, Construction and Maintenance, Feb 7-9

February 7, 2017 - 11:39pm
This three-day course is aimed at covering the full range of topics related to asphalt concrete pavements from materials and mix design to construction, maintenance, and rehabilitation. Asphalt concrete pavements are a vital part of an agency's assets and constitute about 90% of the local streets in California. The numerous topics in this class will be presented in sufficient detail to assist the local agency engineer when dealing with contractors, consultants, and specifications. It is expected that the information presented will be very useful to those that design, specify, and manage asphalt pavements.

Traffic Estimation and Control in an Era of Mixed Human Piloted and Automated Vehicles, Feb 3

February 4, 2017 - 12:39am
Abstract: This talk will explore some new directions in estimation and control when the traffic stream is composed of a mix of human piloted and autonomous vehicles. The first part of the talk investigates the problem of modeling and estimating traffic streams in this mixed setting. A connection between the generalized Aw Rascle Zhang model and two-class traffic motivates the choice to model the flow with a “second order” traffic model. With the system dynamics defined, traffic state is estimated via a fully nonlinear particle filtering approach, and results are compared to estimates obtained from a particle filter applied to a scalar conservation law. Numerical experiments indicate that when the penetration rate of automated vehicles in the traffic stream is highly variable, the second order model based estimator offers improved accuracy compared to a scalar traffic flow model. The second part talk explores the problem of controlling the human piloted traffic with only a small number of autonomous vehicles. We modify the experimental setting of Sugiyama et al. (2008) to measure the influence of a carefully controlled AV on human piloted vehicles. Even when the penetration rate of automated vehicles is as low as 5%, we show it is possible to reduce the presence of stop-and-go waves that can appear without the presence of a bottleneck. Our experiments imply that significant improvements in traffic fuel efficiency and safety may be achieved by means of very few mobile actuators in the traffic stream.

Bio: Daniel Work is an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (courtesy), and the Coordinated Science Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Prof. Work earned his bachelor of science degree (2006) from the Ohio State University, and a master of science (2007) and Ph.D. (2010) from the University of California, Berkeley, each in civil engineering. Prior to joining the faculty at Illinois, Work was a research intern at Nokia Research Center, Palo Alto from 2008-2009, and a guest researcher at Microsoft Research Redmond in 2010. Prof. Work has research interests in transportation cyber physical systems, traffic modeling, and transportation data analytics. Prof. Work’s honors include participation in the National Academy of Engineering’s 2016 EU US Frontiers of Engineering Symposium, the UIUC CEE Excellence Faculty Fellow award (2016), the UIUC ASCE Outstanding Professor award (2015), and the NSF CAREER award (2014).

Jacobs Winter Design Showcase, Dec 7-8

December 9, 2016 - 12:37am
On Wednesday, December 7, and Thursday, December 8, join the Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation for its semesterly showcase of student work in Jacobs Hall. Featuring project displays and demos — along with conversation and refreshments — this lively open house is an opportunity to meet student makers, explore new creations, and take part in Jacobs Hall's richly interdisciplinary community.

Over the course of two days, students in 17 courses, along with Jacobs Hall artists-in-residence and other student designers, will share their work. With projects spanning a wide range of experience levels, academic departments, and areas of interest, the showcase will highlight the diversity of the design innovation ecosystem at Jacobs Hall and at Berkeley. All are welcome to attend — the showcase is free and open to the public.

See the full schedule at: http://bit.ly/2fjb9aX

Jacobs Winter Design Showcase, Dec 8

December 9, 2016 - 12:37am
On Wednesday, December 7, and Thursday, December 8, join the Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation for its semesterly showcase of student work in Jacobs Hall. Featuring project displays and demos — along with conversation and refreshments — this lively open house is an opportunity to meet student makers, explore new creations, and take part in Jacobs Hall's richly interdisciplinary community.

Over the course of two days, students in 17 courses, along with Jacobs Hall artists-in-residence and other student designers, will share their work. With projects spanning a wide range of experience levels, academic departments, and areas of interest, the showcase will highlight the diversity of the design innovation ecosystem at Jacobs Hall and at Berkeley. All are welcome to attend — the showcase is free and open to the public.

See the full schedule at: http://bit.ly/2fjb9aX

The Airport of the Future - Design and Operations, Dec 7

December 7, 2016 - 11:37pm
Eleven groups of students from the highly popular CE153 Airport Design Class, taught by Jasenka Rakas, will present their final term projects. Project themes cover an interesting spectrum of real-world and real-time aviation problems, and range from topics such as relieving delays and congestion, airport environmental evaluations, location of drone stations at airports, airport passenger experience optimization, and seal level risk and adaptation.
The design projects are focused on San Francisco International (SFO) airport, Los Angeles International (LAX) airport, Denver International (DEN) airport, and small airports in the LA Basin.

Jacobs Winter Design Showcase, Dec 7-8

December 7, 2016 - 11:37pm
On Wednesday, December 7, and Thursday, December 8, join the Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation for its semesterly showcase of student work in Jacobs Hall. Featuring project displays and demos — along with conversation and refreshments — this lively open house is an opportunity to meet student makers, explore new creations, and take part in Jacobs Hall's richly interdisciplinary community.

Over the course of two days, students in 17 courses, along with Jacobs Hall artists-in-residence and other student designers, will share their work. With projects spanning a wide range of experience levels, academic departments, and areas of interest, the showcase will highlight the diversity of the design innovation ecosystem at Jacobs Hall and at Berkeley. All are welcome to attend — the showcase is free and open to the public.

See the full schedule at: http://bit.ly/2fjb9aX