Events

Syndicate content
Upcoming Events
Updated: 1 hour 54 min ago

Geometric Design for California, Mar 14-16

March 15, 2017 - 10:38pm
This 3-day course covers the principles and best practices of roadway geometric design for various functional classes of roadways, including local streets, arterials and freeways, intersections and interchanges. This course focuses on practical, real world applications of geometric design methods. Developed with professionals in California in mind, the course will use design standards and guidelines in the Caltrans Highway Design Manual, the AASHTO "Greenbook," and other materials as appropriate. In addition to the geometric design focus, this course also addresses topics related to successful design and re-design practices in California, including stage construction, traffic handling, value analysis, context sensitive approach, owners to designers, etc. This fast-paced, hands-on course combines presentations, case-study examples, problem-solving and class exercises, with ample opportunity for networking and questions.

ERG Colloquium: Carla Peterman, Mar 15

March 15, 2017 - 10:38pm
This study examines the early years of California’s most recent wave of distributed solar PV incentives (2000-2008) to determine the pass-through of incentives to consumers. Examination of this period is important due to the high level of incentives provided and subsequent high cost to ratepayers; policymakers’ expectations that price declines accrue to consumers; and market structure characteristics that might contribute to incomplete pass-through. This analysis shows that incentive pass-through in the California residential solar PV programs was incomplete. The analysis also identifies a lower degree of incentive pass-through for consumers in the highest income zip codes. Whether expectations of incentives’ pass-through align with reality is critically important in the beginning years of emerging clean energy technology programs since this can affect the likelihood of future government investments and public support. Given the often-held policy assumption that consumer prices are declining in response to incentives, it is useful for policymakers to understand the circumstances under which such an assumption may not hold.


Carla J. Peterman was appointed to the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) by Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. in December 2012. She is the CPUC’s assigned Commissioner for a number of proceedings including energy efficiency, alternative transportation, and energy storage.
Dr. Peterman was previously appointed, in 2011, to the California Energy Commission where she was lead Commissioner for renewables, transportation, and natural gas.
She has conducted research at the Energy Institute at Haas and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and was an investment banker focused on energy financing at Lehman Brothers.
Dr. Peterman holds a Doctor of Philosophy in Energy and Resources from The University of California Berkeley. She also earned a Master of Science degree and a Master of Business Administration degree from Oxford University, where she was a Rhodes Scholar. Commissioner Peterman holds a Bachelor of Arts in History from Howard University.

Pavement Management Systems and Preservation Strategies, Mar 15-16

March 15, 2017 - 10:38pm
Pavement networks are often the most valuable asset that an agency owns. This asset is not only expensive to replace, but it is an essential component to the traveling public's safety. Agencies are looking for more cost-effective ways to perform engineering, maintenance, management, and rehabilitation of roadways more than ever before to stretch funding allocations. A pavement management system is an essential tool to assist in cost-effective roadway maintenance planning.

Geometric Design for California, Mar 14-16

March 14, 2017 - 10:39pm
This 3-day course covers the principles and best practices of roadway geometric design for various functional classes of roadways, including local streets, arterials and freeways, intersections and interchanges. This course focuses on practical, real world applications of geometric design methods. Developed with professionals in California in mind, the course will use design standards and guidelines in the Caltrans Highway Design Manual, the AASHTO "Greenbook," and other materials as appropriate. In addition to the geometric design focus, this course also addresses topics related to successful design and re-design practices in California, including stage construction, traffic handling, value analysis, context sensitive approach, owners to designers, etc. This fast-paced, hands-on course combines presentations, case-study examples, problem-solving and class exercises, with ample opportunity for networking and questions.

Transportation as a Language: Mobility management of China’s urban billion, Mar 10

March 11, 2017 - 12:36am
Abstract: The rapid urbanization and economic growth in China uniquely characterize her transportation challenges and corresponding solutions. Extraordinary growth calls for extraordinary measures. Boldness in both infrastructure development and policy design seems commonplace in China’s transportation arena. This talk, however, will present the subtleties in these bold designs through three stories: the rise and decline of bicycles, the high speed rail and mega-regionalization, and contrasting policy models of automobile management. I see urban transportation as a language, to describe a person, to characterize a city, and to understand an institution in contemporary Chinese society. The talk starts and ends with the speculations of the (im)possibility of sustainable transportation in China and a glimpse of hope.

Bio: Jinhua Zhao is the Edward and Joyce Linde Assistant Professor of Urban Planning in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at MIT. He holds Master of Science, Master of City Planning and Ph.D. degrees from MIT and a Bachelor's degree from Tongji University. Prof. Zhao brings behavioral science and transportation technology together to improve urban mobility systems and policies. He also studies China’s urbanization and urban mobility. Prof. Zhao directs the Urban Mobility Lab at MIT.

California Transportation Planning Conference, Mar 3-5

March 6, 2017 - 12:38am
The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), in partnership with the Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS) at University of California, Berkeley present the: 2017 California Transportation Planning Conference, Partnering for Sustainable Transportation: Meeting the Challenge Now and Into the Future.

This three-day conference will provide attendees the opportunity to interact with transportation practitioners and decision-makers, exchange ideas and learn about emerging technologies and advancements in transportation planning from national, state, and local experts. The conference will focus on themes around sustainability and how we can partner to meet the challenges facing us now and into the future as required by California legislation and influenced by funding constraints.

California Transportation Planning Conference, Mar 3-5

March 5, 2017 - 12:37am
The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), in partnership with the Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS) at University of California, Berkeley present the: 2017 California Transportation Planning Conference, Partnering for Sustainable Transportation: Meeting the Challenge Now and Into the Future.

This three-day conference will provide attendees the opportunity to interact with transportation practitioners and decision-makers, exchange ideas and learn about emerging technologies and advancements in transportation planning from national, state, and local experts. The conference will focus on themes around sustainability and how we can partner to meet the challenges facing us now and into the future as required by California legislation and influenced by funding constraints.

California Transportation Planning Conference, Mar 3-5

March 4, 2017 - 12:39am
The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), in partnership with the Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS) at University of California, Berkeley present the: 2017 California Transportation Planning Conference, Partnering for Sustainable Transportation: Meeting the Challenge Now and Into the Future.

This three-day conference will provide attendees the opportunity to interact with transportation practitioners and decision-makers, exchange ideas and learn about emerging technologies and advancements in transportation planning from national, state, and local experts. The conference will focus on themes around sustainability and how we can partner to meet the challenges facing us now and into the future as required by California legislation and influenced by funding constraints.

ERG Colloquium: Andrew McAllister, Mar 1

March 2, 2017 - 12:38am
DESCRIPTION:
In the mid-2000's, California began to establish policy goals for Zero Net Energy (ZNE) buildings. Commissioner McAllister will discuss progress toward these goals in terms of energy-related building codes, trends in buildings-related technologies and markets, local government authority and overall energy systems planning. ZNE buildings serve as a jumping-off point for a broader discussion of California's movement toward distributed energy and decarbonization, including needs and opportunities for energy-savvy professionals and researchers.

BIO:
Andrew McAllister was appointed to the California Energy Commission by Gov. Edmund G. Brown in May 2012, and was reappointed in January 2017. He is lead commissioner for energy efficiency: energy-related building codes, appliance efficiency standards, existing building efficiency and a variety of other programmatic and financing initiatives across the state. He is heavily involved in implementation of several elements of SB 350 (de León, 2015), the Clean Energy and Pollution Reduction Act.

Commissioner McAllister has been working on clean energy deployment and policy for his entire 25-year career: beginning in the early 1990s in project engineering and development, evolving into program design and implementation, then moving into the policy arena. He has worked across the world to develop renewable energy generation, energy efficiency investments, and energy management systems, with counterparts ranging from tiny remote communities to the largest of utilities. He administered two of California’s signature renewable energy programs (California Solar Initiative, Self-Generation Incentive Program), developed and operated energy efficiency programs for utilities, and performed a broad range of policy-related research for California and the U.S. Federal government. He currently serves on the boards of directors of the National Association of State Energy Officials and the Alliance to Save Energy.

Before joining the Energy Commission, McAllister was managing director at the California Center for Sustainable Energy, where he worked for six years. Previously, he worked with NRECA International, Ltd. in the electric sectors of countries in Central and South America, Southeast Asia, and Africa on a variety of renewable generation, load management, utility planning and remote power projects. He was a project manager at an energy consulting firm and worked as an energy efficiency analyst at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Commissioner McAllister holds M.S. and PhD degrees from the Energy & Resources Group at UC Berkeley. He is a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer.

Multicopter Dynamics and Control: Surviving the complete loss of multiple actuators and quickly generating trajectories, Feb 24

February 24, 2017 - 11:40pm
Abstract: Flying robots, such as multicopters, are increasingly becoming part of our everyday lives, with current and future applications including personal transportation, delivery services, entertainment, and aerial sensing. These systems are expected to be safe and to have a high degree of autonomy. This talk will discuss the dynamics and control of multicopters, including some research results on trajectory generation for multicopters and fail-safe algorithms. We will also discuss the intersection of drones with personal transportation, and discuss some of the dominant scaling laws affecting the use of multicopters for personal transportation. Finally, we will present the application of a failsafe algorithm to a fleet of drones performing as part of a live theatre performance on New York's Broadway.

Bio: Mark W. Mueller joined the mechanical engineering department at UC Berkeley in September 2016. He completed his PhD studies, advised by Prof. Raffaello D'Andrea, at the Institute for Dynamic Systems and Control at the ETH Zurich at the end of 2015. He received a bachelors degree from the University of Pretoria, and a masters from the ETH Zurich in 2011, both in Mechanical Engineering.

Superpave Mix Design for Local Agencies, Feb 21-23

February 24, 2017 - 12:38am
The SUPERPAVE mix design method is designed to replace the Hveem method. California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) started implementing the national SUPERPAVE standard for designing, specifying, and accepting pavement projects for all state jobs. The new mix design accounts for traffic loading and environmental conditions and includes a new method of evaluating the asphalt mixture. This course provides an overview of the SUPERPAVE mix design for local agencies and adjustments needed to start transitioning to the new mix design.

NSF CAREER Workshop, Feb 23

February 24, 2017 - 12:38am
The NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is an NSF-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations. The CAREER Award program requires an integration of research and education activities beyond the scope of a regular NSF grant.

BRDO offers a free NSF CAREER Award Workshop for early career faculty each spring. This workshop provides information on NSF CAREER requirements and includes concrete suggestions on how to write a competitive proposal. A panel discussion with current CAREER awardees is a centerpiece of the workshop. Lunch will be provided. Registration required.

Superpave Mix Design for Local Agencies, Feb 21-23

February 22, 2017 - 11:37pm
The SUPERPAVE mix design method is designed to replace the Hveem method. California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) started implementing the national SUPERPAVE standard for designing, specifying, and accepting pavement projects for all state jobs. The new mix design accounts for traffic loading and environmental conditions and includes a new method of evaluating the asphalt mixture. This course provides an overview of the SUPERPAVE mix design for local agencies and adjustments needed to start transitioning to the new mix design.

Superpave Mix Design for Local Agencies, Feb 21-23

February 22, 2017 - 12:35am
The SUPERPAVE mix design method is designed to replace the Hveem method. California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) started implementing the national SUPERPAVE standard for designing, specifying, and accepting pavement projects for all state jobs. The new mix design accounts for traffic loading and environmental conditions and includes a new method of evaluating the asphalt mixture. This course provides an overview of the SUPERPAVE mix design for local agencies and adjustments needed to start transitioning to the new mix design.

Bending the Energy, Environmental, and Safety Curves Through Transportation Automation and Electrification, Feb 17

February 17, 2017 - 11:38pm
Abstract: The combination of vehicle automation and electrification has the potential to fundamentally change the transportation sector. Vehicle crashes, traffic congestion, air pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, energy consumption, and other negative externalities associated with driving could significantly diminish. However, travel may increase with these vehicles, pollution could be concentrated in new areas, and the life cycle impacts could become more important. Methods from engineering, economics, and policy sciences can inform stakeholders at the beginning of the transition to automation on maximizing the benefits and minimizing the challenges. This talk will present recent research on the implications of municipalities transitioning fleets to electric light-duty vehicles and eventual automation. The life cycle environmental, economic, and infrastructure outcomes will be presented, as well as the feasibility of coupling municipal vehicle travel with distributed solar energy. The talk will also highlight three recent research efforts in automation: the impact of automation on VMT from underserved populations, the social cost-effectiveness of early automation features, and the implications of automation on vehicle fuel economy testing and policy.

Bio: Costa Samaras is an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon. His research spans energy, climate change, automation, and defense analysis, and he teaches courses on energy analysis and climate adaptation for infrastructure. He has published studies examining electric and autonomous vehicles, infrastructure adaptation, and energy transitions. Costa directs the Carnegie Mellon Center for Engineering and Resilience for Climate Adaptation, and is an affiliated faculty member in the Traffic21 Research Center, the Scott Institute for Energy Innovation, and the Energy Science, Technology and Policy Program. He is also an Adjunct Senior Researcher at the RAND Corporation. Costa received a joint Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy and from Carnegie Mellon, a M.P.A. in Public Policy from New York University, and a B.S. from Bucknell University.

Traffic Signal Diagnostics and Maintenance, Feb 16

February 17, 2017 - 12:34am
This course covers the essential operational functions of traffic signals, starting with basic design principals and specifications writing techniques. Participants will see and touch each component inside a traffic signal cabinet, a thorough explanation of each component and how they work inside the cabinet. This critical knowledge of each component will provide the skillset necessary for proper diagnostic not just for technicians but also for engineers and signal maintenance managers. Participants will benefit from the instructor team's over sixty years of hands-on experience from both engineering and maintenance perspectives.

Coordinated Decentralized Optimal Control for Connected and Automated Vehicles, Feb 10

February 11, 2017 - 12:39am
Abstract: Recognition of the necessity for connecting vehicles to their surroundings is gaining momentum. In this “new world” of massive amounts of data from vehicles and infrastructure, what we used to model as uncertainty (noise or disturbance) for traffic becomes extra state information in a much higher-dimensional vector. Connected and automated vehicles provide the most intriguing opportunity for enabling users to better monitor transportation network conditions and make better operating decisions to improve safety and reduce pollution, energy consumption, and travel delays. While progress has been made, especially in the area of safety and how accidents could potentially be prevented, one particular question that still remains unanswered is, “How much can we improve fuel consumption, if we assume that the vehicles are connected and can exchange information with each other and with infrastructure?” This talk will address the problem of coordinating vehicles that are wirelessly connected to each other at different transportation segments such as, intersections and merging roadways to achieve a smooth traffic flow without stop-and-go driving. I will present a decentralized optimal control framework whose closed-form solution exists under certain conditions, and which, based on Hamiltonian analysis, yields for each vehicle the optimal acceleration/deceleration at any time in the sense of minimizing fuel consumption. The solution, when it exists, allows the vehicles to cross the intersections and merging roadways without the use of traffic lights, without creating congestion, and under the hard safety constraint of collision avoidance.

Bio: Andreas A. Malikopoulos is an Associate Professor in the department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Delaware. Previously he was the Deputy Director of the Urban Dynamics Institute with the Energy & Transportation Science Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Before joining ORNL, he was with General Motors Global Research & Development. He received a Diploma from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece, in 2000, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 2004 and 2008, respectively, all in Mechanical Engineering. His research interests span several fields, including analysis, optimization, and control of cyber-physical systems; decentralized stochastic systems; stochastic scheduling and resource allocation; and learning in complex systems. The emphasis is on applications related to energy, transportation and operations research. Andreas is the recipient of several prizes and awards, including the 2007 Dare to Dream Opportunity Grant from the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, the 2007 University of Michigan Teaching Fellow, and the 2010 Alvin M. Weinberg Fellowship. He has been selected by the National Academy of Engineering to participate at the 2010 German-American Frontiers of Engineering (FOE) Symposium and organize a session in transportation at the 2016 European-American FOE Symposium. He has also been selected as a 2012 Kavli Frontiers of Science Scholar by the National Academy of Sciences.