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SEEDJAM Tech Expo 2017, Apr 5

April 5, 2017 - 11:33pm
Featured speakers include the Founders & CEO's of Postmates, Quora, Tanium, and Figma.

SEEDJAM is an annual exposition of all the innovative products coming out of startups at Berkeley and beyond. Every year exhibitors come to UC Berkeley to demonstrate the latest and greatest in technology.

View from the Top: Dan Rasky, Apr 5

April 5, 2017 - 11:33pm

Traffic Signal Design: Engineering Concepts, Mar 29-30

March 30, 2017 - 10:38pm
This newly updated course covers basic concepts, standards, and practices related to the design and installation of traffic signals. Within the framework of the California Vehicle Code, California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (CA MUTCD), and Chapter 9 on Highway Lighting from Caltrans Traffic Manual, this course will explore the relationship among various engineering disciplines as foundations for signal design; introduce signal phasing diagrams, signal controllers and cabinets; explain the layouts of signal heads, signal poles, conductor schedule, and associated signal conduits, pullboxes, wiring, interconnects, detection and safety lighting. The course includes lectures, sample problems, and exercise projects that will familiarize the course participant with the design process for a simple signal design plan, and to provide for a unit-price-based cost estimate. While this course will focus only on the introductory engineering aspects in signal design and introduce some local agencies' equivalent standards and specifications that vary from Caltrans, the goal is for the course participants to become familiar with standards and specifications that guide the design and lead to successful project delivery of an operational traffic signal.

Transit-Oriented Development: Putting it all Together, Mar 20-29

March 29, 2017 - 10:39pm
Transit-oriented development (TOD) has emerged as a powerful, effective way to integrate land use and public transit. TOD done right links smart growth and sustainability with higher capacity rail or bus transit services. This linkage takes place in the environs of the rail passenger station or the bus rapid transit stop. TOD concentrates workplaces, residences, and supporting retail services within convenient walking distance of rail or bus rapid transit service. In doing so, TOD brings customers to public transit services as well as creates vibrant, mixed-use communities. There are many challenges in creating successful TODs. These include building effective public-private partnerships, ensuring multi-modal TOD access for the "last mile" and beyond, "right-sizing parking", and balancing private and public uses to create a unique place identify.

Traffic Signal Design: Engineering Concepts, Mar 29-30

March 29, 2017 - 10:39pm
This newly updated course covers basic concepts, standards, and practices related to the design and installation of traffic signals. Within the framework of the California Vehicle Code, California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (CA MUTCD), and Chapter 9 on Highway Lighting from Caltrans Traffic Manual, this course will explore the relationship among various engineering disciplines as foundations for signal design; introduce signal phasing diagrams, signal controllers and cabinets; explain the layouts of signal heads, signal poles, conductor schedule, and associated signal conduits, pullboxes, wiring, interconnects, detection and safety lighting. The course includes lectures, sample problems, and exercise projects that will familiarize the course participant with the design process for a simple signal design plan, and to provide for a unit-price-based cost estimate. While this course will focus only on the introductory engineering aspects in signal design and introduce some local agencies' equivalent standards and specifications that vary from Caltrans, the goal is for the course participants to become familiar with standards and specifications that guide the design and lead to successful project delivery of an operational traffic signal.

Transit-Oriented Development: Putting it all Together, Mar 20-29

March 27, 2017 - 11:35pm
Transit-oriented development (TOD) has emerged as a powerful, effective way to integrate land use and public transit. TOD done right links smart growth and sustainability with higher capacity rail or bus transit services. This linkage takes place in the environs of the rail passenger station or the bus rapid transit stop. TOD concentrates workplaces, residences, and supporting retail services within convenient walking distance of rail or bus rapid transit service. In doing so, TOD brings customers to public transit services as well as creates vibrant, mixed-use communities. There are many challenges in creating successful TODs. These include building effective public-private partnerships, ensuring multi-modal TOD access for the "last mile" and beyond, "right-sizing parking", and balancing private and public uses to create a unique place identify.

Changing Fuel Loading Behavior to Improve Airline Fuel Efficiency, Mar 24

March 24, 2017 - 10:34pm
Abstract: Airlines rely on flight dispatchers to perform the duty of fuel planning. The required trip fuel is calculated by airlines’ Flight Planning Systems (FPS). However, the FPS trip fuel predictions are not always accurate. If planned trip fuel is higher than actual trip fuel, then a flight will waste fuel by carrying excess fuel weight. On the other hand, if trip fuel is under-estimated, then a flight might run into fuel emergency. In practice, dispatchers may also load contingency fuel to mitigate the risks of under-prediction. FPS also calculates recommended contingency fuel quantity for dispatchers called statistical contingency fuel (SCF). However, dispatchers will almost always load extra fuel above suggested SCF values. Therefore, airline fuel efficiency can be improved by more accurate fuel predictions, a deeper understanding of dispatchers’ fuel loading behavior, and more reliable SCF recommendations. Based on a large scale flight fuel loading dataset provided by a US major airline, an ensemble learning algorithm is proposed to improve fuel burn prediction. This method is found to reduce prediction error by over 50% compared to airline’s own predictions. By merging with a dispatcher survey, we are able to integrate dispatchers’ latent attributes into contingency fuel loading modeling. Furthermore, random quantile forests method will also be discussed in improving SCF recommendations. The benefit of improved fuel efficiency will be measured by estimating cost-to-carry reduced unnecessary fuel loading.

Bio: Lei Kang is a Ph.D. candidate of the Institute of Transportation Studies in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley. He received a Master of Arts degree in Biostatistics from the Division of Biostatistics at University of California, Berkeley. He also obtained his Master’s degree in Transportation and Infrastructure Systems Engineering from Purdue University. Lei's Bachelor’s degree is in Transportation Engineering from Tongji University in Shanghai, China. He is a member of the Committee on Airfield and Airspace Capacity and Delay, Transportation Research Board. His research interests are in the application of statistical methods and machine learning techniques to air traffic management and airline fuel loading decisions. He is also interested in causal inference in the area of traffic safety.

Inside NSF, Mar 23

March 23, 2017 - 11:47pm
This workshop will explain how NSF is structured, how it functions, and how it reviews proposals, with an eye towards how trends and federal policies affect its work. This session will help faculty apply an understanding of how NSF works to their funding strategies.

Transit-Oriented Development: Putting it all Together, Mar 20-29

March 22, 2017 - 10:42pm
Transit-oriented development (TOD) has emerged as a powerful, effective way to integrate land use and public transit. TOD done right links smart growth and sustainability with higher capacity rail or bus transit services. This linkage takes place in the environs of the rail passenger station or the bus rapid transit stop. TOD concentrates workplaces, residences, and supporting retail services within convenient walking distance of rail or bus rapid transit service. In doing so, TOD brings customers to public transit services as well as creates vibrant, mixed-use communities. There are many challenges in creating successful TODs. These include building effective public-private partnerships, ensuring multi-modal TOD access for the "last mile" and beyond, "right-sizing parking", and balancing private and public uses to create a unique place identify.

Transit-Oriented Development: Putting it all Together, Mar 20-29

March 20, 2017 - 10:40pm
Transit-oriented development (TOD) has emerged as a powerful, effective way to integrate land use and public transit. TOD done right links smart growth and sustainability with higher capacity rail or bus transit services. This linkage takes place in the environs of the rail passenger station or the bus rapid transit stop. TOD concentrates workplaces, residences, and supporting retail services within convenient walking distance of rail or bus rapid transit service. In doing so, TOD brings customers to public transit services as well as creates vibrant, mixed-use communities. There are many challenges in creating successful TODs. These include building effective public-private partnerships, ensuring multi-modal TOD access for the "last mile" and beyond, "right-sizing parking", and balancing private and public uses to create a unique place identify.

Bayesian Optimization and Self Driving Cars, Mar 17

March 17, 2017 - 10:38pm
Abstract: An important property of embedded learning systems is the ever-changing environment they create for all algorithms operating in the system. Optimizing the performance of those algorithms becomes a perpetual online activity rather than a one-off task. I will review some of these challenges in autonomous vehicles. I will discuss active optimization methods and their application in robotics and scientific applications, focusing on scaling up the dimensionality and managing multi-fidelity evaluations. I will finish with lessons learned and thoughts on future directions as we strive to bring autonomous vehicles into widespread use.

Bio: Dr. Jeff Schneider is the engineering lead for machine learning at Uber's Advanced Technologies Center. He is also a research professor in the Carnegie Mellon University School of Computer Science. He has 20 years experience developing, publishing, and applying machine learning algorithms in government, science, and industry. He has more than 100 publications and regularly gives talks and tutorials on the subject.

Geometric Design for California, Mar 14-16

March 16, 2017 - 11:38pm
This 3-day course covers the principles and best practices of roadway geometric design for various functional classes of roadways, including local streets, arterials and freeways, intersections and interchanges. This course focuses on practical, real world applications of geometric design methods. Developed with professionals in California in mind, the course will use design standards and guidelines in the Caltrans Highway Design Manual, the AASHTO "Greenbook," and other materials as appropriate. In addition to the geometric design focus, this course also addresses topics related to successful design and re-design practices in California, including stage construction, traffic handling, value analysis, context sensitive approach, owners to designers, etc. This fast-paced, hands-on course combines presentations, case-study examples, problem-solving and class exercises, with ample opportunity for networking and questions.

Pavement Management Systems and Preservation Strategies, Mar 15-16

March 16, 2017 - 11:38pm
Pavement networks are often the most valuable asset that an agency owns. This asset is not only expensive to replace, but it is an essential component to the traveling public's safety. Agencies are looking for more cost-effective ways to perform engineering, maintenance, management, and rehabilitation of roadways more than ever before to stretch funding allocations. A pavement management system is an essential tool to assist in cost-effective roadway maintenance planning.

Geometric Design for California, Mar 14-16

March 15, 2017 - 10:38pm
This 3-day course covers the principles and best practices of roadway geometric design for various functional classes of roadways, including local streets, arterials and freeways, intersections and interchanges. This course focuses on practical, real world applications of geometric design methods. Developed with professionals in California in mind, the course will use design standards and guidelines in the Caltrans Highway Design Manual, the AASHTO "Greenbook," and other materials as appropriate. In addition to the geometric design focus, this course also addresses topics related to successful design and re-design practices in California, including stage construction, traffic handling, value analysis, context sensitive approach, owners to designers, etc. This fast-paced, hands-on course combines presentations, case-study examples, problem-solving and class exercises, with ample opportunity for networking and questions.

ERG Colloquium: Carla Peterman, Mar 15

March 15, 2017 - 10:38pm
This study examines the early years of California’s most recent wave of distributed solar PV incentives (2000-2008) to determine the pass-through of incentives to consumers. Examination of this period is important due to the high level of incentives provided and subsequent high cost to ratepayers; policymakers’ expectations that price declines accrue to consumers; and market structure characteristics that might contribute to incomplete pass-through. This analysis shows that incentive pass-through in the California residential solar PV programs was incomplete. The analysis also identifies a lower degree of incentive pass-through for consumers in the highest income zip codes. Whether expectations of incentives’ pass-through align with reality is critically important in the beginning years of emerging clean energy technology programs since this can affect the likelihood of future government investments and public support. Given the often-held policy assumption that consumer prices are declining in response to incentives, it is useful for policymakers to understand the circumstances under which such an assumption may not hold.


Carla J. Peterman was appointed to the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) by Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. in December 2012. She is the CPUC’s assigned Commissioner for a number of proceedings including energy efficiency, alternative transportation, and energy storage.
Dr. Peterman was previously appointed, in 2011, to the California Energy Commission where she was lead Commissioner for renewables, transportation, and natural gas.
She has conducted research at the Energy Institute at Haas and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and was an investment banker focused on energy financing at Lehman Brothers.
Dr. Peterman holds a Doctor of Philosophy in Energy and Resources from The University of California Berkeley. She also earned a Master of Science degree and a Master of Business Administration degree from Oxford University, where she was a Rhodes Scholar. Commissioner Peterman holds a Bachelor of Arts in History from Howard University.

Pavement Management Systems and Preservation Strategies, Mar 15-16

March 15, 2017 - 10:38pm
Pavement networks are often the most valuable asset that an agency owns. This asset is not only expensive to replace, but it is an essential component to the traveling public's safety. Agencies are looking for more cost-effective ways to perform engineering, maintenance, management, and rehabilitation of roadways more than ever before to stretch funding allocations. A pavement management system is an essential tool to assist in cost-effective roadway maintenance planning.

Geometric Design for California, Mar 14-16

March 14, 2017 - 10:39pm
This 3-day course covers the principles and best practices of roadway geometric design for various functional classes of roadways, including local streets, arterials and freeways, intersections and interchanges. This course focuses on practical, real world applications of geometric design methods. Developed with professionals in California in mind, the course will use design standards and guidelines in the Caltrans Highway Design Manual, the AASHTO "Greenbook," and other materials as appropriate. In addition to the geometric design focus, this course also addresses topics related to successful design and re-design practices in California, including stage construction, traffic handling, value analysis, context sensitive approach, owners to designers, etc. This fast-paced, hands-on course combines presentations, case-study examples, problem-solving and class exercises, with ample opportunity for networking and questions.

Transportation as a Language: Mobility management of China’s urban billion, Mar 10

March 11, 2017 - 12:36am
Abstract: The rapid urbanization and economic growth in China uniquely characterize her transportation challenges and corresponding solutions. Extraordinary growth calls for extraordinary measures. Boldness in both infrastructure development and policy design seems commonplace in China’s transportation arena. This talk, however, will present the subtleties in these bold designs through three stories: the rise and decline of bicycles, the high speed rail and mega-regionalization, and contrasting policy models of automobile management. I see urban transportation as a language, to describe a person, to characterize a city, and to understand an institution in contemporary Chinese society. The talk starts and ends with the speculations of the (im)possibility of sustainable transportation in China and a glimpse of hope.

Bio: Jinhua Zhao is the Edward and Joyce Linde Assistant Professor of Urban Planning in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at MIT. He holds Master of Science, Master of City Planning and Ph.D. degrees from MIT and a Bachelor's degree from Tongji University. Prof. Zhao brings behavioral science and transportation technology together to improve urban mobility systems and policies. He also studies China’s urbanization and urban mobility. Prof. Zhao directs the Urban Mobility Lab at MIT.

California Transportation Planning Conference, Mar 3-5

March 6, 2017 - 12:38am
The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), in partnership with the Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS) at University of California, Berkeley present the: 2017 California Transportation Planning Conference, Partnering for Sustainable Transportation: Meeting the Challenge Now and Into the Future.

This three-day conference will provide attendees the opportunity to interact with transportation practitioners and decision-makers, exchange ideas and learn about emerging technologies and advancements in transportation planning from national, state, and local experts. The conference will focus on themes around sustainability and how we can partner to meet the challenges facing us now and into the future as required by California legislation and influenced by funding constraints.