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  •  The architect Sebastian Mariscal begins his plans for any future project with the same question, one that has little to do with the aesthetics of a building or the experience of the people who will one day use it. "When I design a building,” he says, "the first thing I have to resolve is my parking." He means, by this, that he must weigh requirements in most city codes mandating a specific ratio of off-street parking spaces for each new unit of housing or office space.

    Atlantic Cities
  • Once a week or so we come across yet another sign that Millennials care much less about car ownership than previous generations. They're less likely to drive than their parents. They've got less debt tied up in cars. They'd rather hang out with their friends on Twitter than get in a car to go see them.

    Atlantic Cities
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    Over the last 15 years, Amtrak ridership has grown 55 percent, outpacing population growth by a factor of three. It’s the fastest growing means of domestic transport, and shows no signs of slowing down. So why do its routes continue to lose so much money?

    Atlantic Cities
  • Airport officials across the country say they're bracing for flight delays and longer security lines in April, even as details remain scarce about precisely where $85 billion in federal spending cuts will hit....Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood has warned that furloughing 10% of air-traffic controllers could delay flights 90 minutes at the busiest airports. He also says furloughs could force the elimination of midnight shifts at 60 smaller airports and the closing of towers at 100 of the smallest airports.

    USA Today
  • For the fifth time this year, airlines are trying to raise fares, says Rick Seaney, CEO of FareCompare.com, which tracks fares. The previous three attempts focused on tickets purchased within seven days of travel, which are typically most popular among business travelers.

    USA Today
  • Opponents of the regional One Bay Area growth plan say it is one bad idea. They disagree with the proposed plan’s focus on building high-density housing near mass transit centers and using federal transportation dollars as a carrot. They call it “stack-and-pack” housing being pushed onto cities and citizens by unelected bureaucrats in a way that will transform the Bay Area.

    Daily Republic
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    ...(N)ationwide gasoline price averages over the first two months of the year rose at such a blistering rate that Americans were on pace to pay half a trillion dollars on gasoline in 2013 for the first time ever, analysts said. The high prices were causing big changes in the driving habits of American motorists, with gasoline consumption dropping sharply.

    LA Times
  • Nearly five years after Peninsula cities first sued to block California's high-speed train from running along the Caltrain corridor, a judge has dismissed the case in a long-awaited victory for bullet train backers.

    Mercury News
  • BART's board of directors Thursday approved a 5.2 percent fare increase, which will raise the average one-way fare from $3.59 to $3.78 starting Jan. 1. That will cost the average daily BART commuter about $50 over the course of a year.

    Mercury News
  •  When California held its first-ever auction of greenhouse gas emission allowances last fall, allowances sold for $10.09, just pennies above the $10 floor price set by state regulators. Some observers warned that the low price meant the state's new cap-and-trade program wouldn't work and was a sign that companies were not participating. But in the second auction last week, the allowances sold for $13.62 each, higher than many analysts had expected.

    Mercury News