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    Yikes. I literally do not know where to start with today’s article. But I’ll give it a shot: at the top, you’re looking at the view northward "from the turnstiles" at the Douglas Road transit station in Coral Gables, just outside of Miami. 

    Atlantic Cities
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    This month marks 120 years since the federal government got involved in funding road transportation. (Strange as it sounds, bicycle advocates did the bulk of the lobbying.) The original Office of Road Inquiry — today, the Federal Highway Administration — was a line item with a budget of $10,000. That was only enough money to build about three miles of road, and the office wasn't empowered to build roads anyway, but states fought tooth and nail against giving the feds even this incredibly modest level of transport oversight.

    Atlantic Cities
  • The public will have a chance to voice opinions Wednesday on plans for high-occupancy vehicle ramps along the center divider of Interstate 680 in San Ramon...The ramps were originally proposed for the Norris Canyon overpass, but were vigorously opposed by neighbors at public meetings last year.

    Contra Costa Times
  • Bart directors and officials say that revenues from fare increases they just approved for every even-numbered year from now to 2020 will go only for capital improvements. But buried in the resolution the board approved last month is language that enables the additional money to go, in part, to "meeting operating expenses such as employee wage rates and fring benefits."

    Contra Costa Times
  • ...The state gas tax will rise 3.5 cents a gallon, to 39.5 cents, on July 1 after a recent vote by the state Board of Equalization.

    Mercury News
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    ...The Chronicle requested data on delays lasting 15 minutes or longer from Nov. 1, 2011, to Oct. 31, 2012, and found that problems with train brakes, propulsion systems, automatic train-control systems, doors and electrical systems accounted for the bulk of the 573 lengthier delays...What those systems have in common is age, and the costly proposition of replacing them...But the physical woes of mechanical middle age are not the transit system's only challenge. Growing numbers of passengers - and the disruptions they cause, sometimes intentionally - also lead to delays.

    SF Chronicle
  • With the technologically advanced 787, Boeing offered airlines big fuel savings and better comfort for passengers. It also promised something else: the ability to reach just about any airport on the globe without having to stop.

    New York Times
  • In a marked shift of protocol, the New York Police Department has begun conducting robust investigations of traffic crashes that result in critical injuries but not certain or likely death. In the past, investigators from a specialized unit, the Accident Investigation Squad, were sent only when at least one victim had died or was deemed by first responders to be “likely to die.”

    New York Times
  • For drivers who regularly face the challenges of parking in Manhattan, the age of technology has provided precious few options...Pango officially went into use this week at the Imperial garage on 77th Street near Lexington Avenue. The New York location, along with Phoenix, where the service was introduced earlier this month, represents the debut of Pango in the United States...

    New York Times
  • Republican eminence grise George Shultz addressed a packed room on Capitol Hill Friday to press for a carbon tax. He spent three days in Washington with scientists from MIT and Stanford to talk about advances in alternative fuels, including a potential “game changing” breakthrough under way at Stanford that could quadruple the driving range of lithium ion batteries, putting electric cars on a par with internal combustion engines.

    SF Chronicle