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    Metro's going to make $18 to $20 million off its ExpressLanes program, which charges solo drivers to use new carpool lanes on the 110 (and soon the 10). The program just launched on November 10, but it's already it's got yet another revenue stream coming in: citations to drivers "caught on camera without the required FasTrak transponders." 

    Curbed LA
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    ...(T)he sense one gets from a new pre- and post-storm review of city transportation [PDF], released earlier this week by NYU's Rudin Center, is that things could have been much, much worse...The MTA's preparedness was matched by the "inventiveness" of city commuters, writes the NYU report.

    Atlantic Cities
  • Panels of experts assigned to review major state projects are only credible if they are transparent and independent. Because the one that Caltrans trotted out to look at bridge safety was far from the ideal, it's imperative that state lawmakers explore how to make the panels better.

    Sacramento Bee
  • Questions about real and perceived conflicts of interst among experts hired to review California megaprojects, such as the Bay Bridge, high-speed rail and Delta twin water diversion tunnels, are driving state legislators to look at writing stiff new rules for peer review panels. 

    Contra Costa Times
  • Just how many new riders would jump on a train to one of Silicon Valley's most desired destinations? About 200, it turns out--and it would cost taxpayers up to $175 million to build the rail line to Los Gatos...."You could buy every one of (the riders) a Bentley and a driver," said Dave Fadness, a longtime Santa Clara County transportation commissioner. "It's crazy."

    Mercury News
  • zzlolderwalkers.jpg

    UC Berkeley professor of epidemiology and community health William Satariano and other experts say the relationship a person has to the surrounding environment becomes crucial as his or her body wears down. One-third to one-half of adults 65 or older are estimated to be physically impaired.

    SF Chronicle
  • In an unusual move Tuesday night, San Clemente's elected leaders told the California Department of Transportation that it can't have access to city streets to supply power to a digital freeway message board that could affect a local neighborhood....Councilman Tim Brown said smartphones and other digital devices have surpassed freeway message boards. "I question, really, the need for more of these signs on our freeways when, frankly, the people make an informed decision before they leave the house as to the traffic impacts," Brown said. "Or, particularly in this case, where you've got a sign that's just two miles down providing a lot of the information necessary, with no diversion points."

    Orange County Register
  • It’s that time again – the season for fairy-tale car ads in which American families with glossy hair and dazzling teeth present each other with fancy automobiles as Christmas gifts....This year, though, there is a hint of anxiety in the (Lexus) company’s ad campaign, a seeming reflection of the auto industry's new reality: that Millennials are not driving, and by extension not purchasing or even expecting as gifts, new cars anywhere near as much as their parents did.

    Atlantic Cities
  • ...In early 2012, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa tasked city department heads with developing and implementing a strategy for transit oriented development....his ad-hoc committee produced a serious report outlining the steps the city needs to take to create a unified T.O.D. Plan and implement it. The plan looked at L.A. as a series of major transit corridors and concluded something obvious: that the city needs to coordinate its department heads and visionaries to create an implement plans for these areas before any true urban planning can happen. Last week, Villaraigosa took the long-awaited first step to make that happen.

    LA .Streetsblog.org
  • ...“The pockets of neighborhoods that seem to have weathered this economic trauma we’ve had, particularly in the housing market, have been these great little accessible neighborhoods near transit stations, particularly in central cities or inner-ring neighborhoods,” said Robert Cervero, Professor of City and Regional Planning at the University of California, Berkeley. 

    Intransition Magazine