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  • walking-schoolbus-lrg-300x236.jpg

    In just two generations, the share of American kids who walk or bike to school has plummeted — dropping from 50 percent in 1969 to 13 percent today. Can the trend be reversed? Yes, according to new research that shows the impact of street safety infrastructure and other programs implemented with federal Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funds.

    Streetsblog USA
  • Rail1-master675.jpg

    A group of Washington investors with high-level political backing and a $5 billion commitment from the Japanese government is pressing ahead with its vision of a high-speed train that could whisk passengers between New York and Washington in about an hour... It is one of several high-speed rail projects proposed for the heavily trafficked Northeast Corridor, where chronic traffic congestion and flight delays are expected to get worse.

    New York Times
  • Finland's Minister of Economic Affairs said yesterday (Oct 21) that his country would help Viet Nam achieve ambitious targets for smart and green cities by providing assistance in sustainable urban planning, industrial design, clean technologies and digital services, along with education and training.

    VietNamNet Bridge
  • ...From Pacific Heights to Hayes Valley, Potrero Hill and the Castro, strips of curb are being legally blocked off as tow-away zones by construction crews, both private and public — an incursion that can last weeks, if not months...Currently there are 1,231 active construction parking permits, as well as 542 excavation permits for the installation and repair of utilities within the roadway, said Rachel Gordon, a public works spokeswoman.

    SF Chronicle
  • With a swipe on a smartphone, San Francisco motorists can summon a valet anywhere in the city. Wearing a necktie and a bright-blue jacket, a valet zooms up on a scooter, whisks away a user’s car to a secure parking lot, and returns the car whenever and wherever the driver wants for just $15 or less.

    SF Chronicle
  •  Those programmed lights on the Bay Bridge will come down early next year, but they then could return once and for all — if, and only if, the creators of the shimmering installation can raise $4million by Dec. 31...Creators haven’t been shy about their desire to make the large-scale light show permanent, but an initial push to raise funds for a 10-year reinstallation sputtered this summer. Now, there’s an evolving agreement that if “Bay Lights” boosters can raise the $4million necessary to reinstall an upgraded version, bridge crews will keep an eye on things from there on out.

    SF Chronicle
  • ...“SWITCH is a tool we can use to examine the different choices of technologies within the electrical power sector and their locations. It enables us to estimate the impact on regional air pollution emissions, as well as how much land area and water consumption would be needed for each scenario. We have used this model for different future energy scenarios across western North America, and we see an enormous variation in both the magnitude and location of environmental impacts,” explains doctoral candidate Tessa Beach. She is presenting the tool today together with Professor Daniel Kammen, Director of Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory, both from the University of California, Berkeley.

    University of Copenhagen
  • ...The lane-splitting crash study, conducted by UC Berkeley and commissioned by the California Highway Patrol and the Office of Traffic Safety, also found that lane-splitters are less likely to be rear-ended by car drivers but are more likely to rear-end other vehicles.

    Sacramento Bee
  • Years of painstaking work and community input have moved two major San Francisco corridors toward accommodating bus rapid transit, but according to an expert on the system, the infrastructure changes may have to be more dramatic to really improve Muni's performance.

    SF Examiner
  • lead_large.jpg

    ...The traffic-hacking device is the invention of Bay Area man Nat Collins, a longtime tech worker and avid cyclist. (Seriously, the guy owns six bikes.) Collins has designed it to help out in situations when a bike rider is stuck at a light—for instance, in a lane with a left-turn signal that seems forever red.

    CityLab