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  • zzHSR-plan.jpg

    Doubts about the High Speed Rail Authority’s ability to fund its estimated $68 billion program dominated last week’s Senate Transportation and Housing Committee hearing (see the background report in this PDF). Committee Chair Senator Mark DeSaulnier (D-Concord) said he was “somewhat skeptical” about the Authority’s 2014 Draft Business Plan and questioned CAHSRA CEO Jeff Morales on the authority’s reliance on uncertain funding sources. “You couldn’t get a [small business loan] based on what we’re assuming here,” DeSaulnier told Morales, referring to the high cost estimates and funding prospects in the Business Plan.

    Streetsblog LA
  • ...We're driving less. Adjusted for population growth, the number of vehicle miles driven per year has dropped 8.9 percent since peaking in 2005...But a new study co-led by myself; Evelyn Blumenberg from the University of California, Los Angeles; and Casey Dawkins from the University of Maryland suggests there is at least one group that may need help to drive more, not less: low-income residents of high-poverty neighborhoods.

    Atlantic Cities
  • zzparking.jpg

    Costanza's universal theory of parking states that drivers should never pay for a spot because, if they apply themselves, they'll get it for free. Most U.S. cities do everything they can to abide the theory. They undervalue the price of street spaces. They keep parking so cheap itencourages driving (and thus undermines their own transit investments, leading to more driving). And they require a minimum number of parking spaces for new developments whether residents need them or not.

    Atlantic Cities
  • ...There has been a surge in orders for the coveted stickers, with 38,203 issued as of Friday. The limit -- for now -- is 40,000 and many officials thought it would be summer before that would be reached. Now it's believed they could run out this week.

    Contra Costa Times
  • The fix for a faulty ignition switch linked to 13 traffic deaths would have cost just 57 cents, members of Congress said Tuesday as they demanded answers from General Motors' new CEO on why the automaker took 10 years to recall cars with the defect.

    AP/SF Chronicle
  • The fix for a faulty ignition switch linked to 13 traffic deaths would have cost just 57 cents, members of Congress said Tuesday as they demanded answers from General Motors' new CEO on why the automaker took 10 years to recall cars with the defect.

    AP/SF Chronicle
  • ...The California Highway Patrol joined Oakland, San Francisco and Berkeley police and state traffic officials at a news conference and demonstration at the Coliseum parking lot Tuesday to hammer home the dangers of using a cell phone while driving behind the wheel... “Just three seconds of texting while driving at highway speeds is equal to driving the length of a football field blindfolded,” said Chris Cochran, assistnt director of the California Office of Traffic Safety.

    SF Chronicle
  • wwsprawl.jpg

    Back in 2002, in an attempt to quantify the extent and effects of sprawl development, Smart Growth released a report called Measuring Sprawl and Its Impact. This week, the group has come out with a follow-up study that uses more and better datasets to rank U.S. metro areas in terms of sprawl. It also outlines the human and economic costs of sprawl development....Among large metro areas, “The biggest success story is surprisingly Los Angeles,” says Reid Ewing, a University of Utah professor who was the lead researcher on the study. “Los Angeles has actually densified substantially.” The famously car-dependent California city ranked seventh among metro areas with populations over one million.

    Atlantic Cities
  • ...(T)he fight over Sunday meters, which seemed to have been settled more than a year ago, has been rekindled as one of the big issues as the MTA board goes through the arduous process of adopting a budget for the two-year cycle that starts July 1.

    SF Chronicle
  • zzshuttledemonstrate.jpg

    Tech employee shuttle buses will be allowed to use a limited number of Muni stops for a fee after city officials voted Tuesday to deny an environmental appeal meant to stall the pilot program...Proponents of the buses say they keep thousands of cars off the road and that the program will help the city regulate them. One oft-cited UC Berkeley study that surveyed 130 regional shuttle riders showed almost half would drive to work alone from San Francisco if they couldn't ride a bus.

    SF Chronicle