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  • ...Boston's bike lanes have since grown from less than one mile in 2007 to more than 60 miles today. Over 22,000 people bike to work each morning. Yet, in Boston's surrounding suburban communities—those with many city commuters—town officials may need to rethink their own cycling infrastructure: Cyclists traveling the outskirts of Boston are being struck by vehicles at alarming rates.

    CityLabs
  • The latest CityCast podcast, produced in partnership with Southern California Public Radio's KPCC, features The Future of Transportation series editor and CityLab contributing writer Eric Jaffe as he looks back at the stories and ideas we've explored over the past nine months. 

    CityLabs
  • The United States Coast Guard is looking into what caused a ferry to crash into a piling at Pier 41 in San Francisco Sunday...Officials said 10 passengers suffered minor injuries and were transported to the hospital for evaluation.

    Mercury News
  • If the Loma Prieta earthquake happened today, Buck Helm might have survived his Nimitz Freeway commute to watch his two youngest children grow up. Donna Marsden could have finished fixing up her Victorian home. Delores Stewart could have cheered on her beloved Oakland A's...An extensive Bay Area News Group survey of our infrastructure offers much reassurance: Major water pipes are now designed to bend, not break. Bridges and overpasses can better support us. Gas and power lines are safer near fault lines. Hospitals are sturdier. But our readiness to recover from the Big One gets far from a perfect score -- more like a C-plus, say experts who study quake preparation around the globe.

    Mercury News
  • ...Sgt.-Tom-the Alameda-Deputy calls this new law a "very sticky issue" and explains why: "It will be very difficult to enforce the 3-foot distance at any time. Bicycle riders are unpredictable. It is my opinion that few if any cops will write a ticket for the 3-foot rule. It is going to be: He said, he said. In a trial the question will be: How did you measure 3 feet? Without a way to do it, every case will get thrown out or result in a not-guilty verdict.

    Mercury News
  • A rushing cyclist mows down a woman in Central Park in September, killing her, the second bicycle-pedestrian death there in two months. A citywide conversation ensues, rich with ranting, about the bicycle menace. n truth, practically everyone in motion around this city has a right to feel put upon. Bikes menace pedestrians, cars menace bikes and pedestrians, trucks and buses menace everybody. Cyclists, aggrieved, say they’re only trying to survive in a treacherous world of potholes, flinging car doors and oblivious buses. White “ghost bikes,” chained around the city at accident sites, promote a mournful sense of two-wheeled vulnerability. There are no ghost shoes for the pedestrians who have died in far greater numbers.

    New York Times
  • After years of shying away from science, engineering and clean-technology start-ups, investors are beginning to take an interest in them again, raising hopes among entrepreneurs in those areas that a long slump is finally over. But these start-ups face intense pressure to prove that their science can turn a profit more quickly than hot tech companies like Snapchat and Uber.

    New York Times
  • By last month, state transportation officials in Missouri said they had seen enough. Federal highway officials had long insisted that guardrails throughout the state were safe. But some guardrail heads had apparently malfunctioned, in essence turning the rails into spears when cars hit them and injuring people instead of cushioning the blow, Missouri officials said.

    New York Times
  • Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk unveiled an all-wheel-drive version of the electric Model S sedan Thursday dubbed the "D," an option geared for potential customers who live in snowy climates...Musk also unveiled a host of new safety and autopilot features for the Model S that put Tesla closer toward autonomous driving.

    Contra Costa Times
  • The average fuel economy of new vehicles sold in the U.S. hit a record high last year, rising 0.5 miles per gallon over 2012, federal officials announced on Wednesday. The Environmental Protection Agency said on Tuesday that model year 2013 vehicles averaged 24.1 mpg, nearly 5 mpg higher than 2004 levels.

    The Hill