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  • A study by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories concludes that a number of existing gas stations in California can safely store and dispense hydrogen, suggesting a broader network of hydrogen fueling stations may be within reach. The report examined 70 commercial gasoline stations in the state of California and sought to determine which, if any, could integrate hydrogen fuel, based on the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) hydrogen technologies code published in 2011.

    Science Daily
  • Researchers at the University of California, Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering have created a lithium ion battery that outperforms the current industry standard by three times. The key material: sand. Yes, sand.

    Science Daily
  • The question of how Uber would spend its billion-dollar investment was never really much of a riddle. More rides in more places has always been the plan...Consider Uber’s kinship with Amazon. The comparison isn’t obvious at first, since Uber doesn’t sell goods, just a service. But their stories are similar. A startup led by a brash, charismatic CEO catches a creaky old industry unaware. It grows quickly, and its popularity explodes as its brand becomes nearly synonymous with the disruptive service it’s offering. 

    Wired
  • Uber Technologies says it is temporarily cutting its prices in New York City with the aim of making its service cheaper than an average taxi ride, the car service app announced Monday...It wasn't clear how Uber's "surge pricing" scheme would compete with taxi fares. The controversial strategy increases the price of rides as demand increases. Uber faced criticism when it instituted surge pricing in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy.

    SF Chronicle
  • ...San Francisco has been waiting for Van Ness BRT a long time. The line was a signature project in the half-cent sales tax referendum, Proposition K, that city voters approved in 2003. The original plan called for Van Ness to be up and running by late 2009. The latest timeline has BRT beginning operations in 2018—a full decade and a half after the Prop K vote (which itself came years after the route concept emerged).

    CityLab
  • From the Marin IJ headline "Feds hail Marin's $28m bike path program" a reader would assume that Marin's Nonmotorized Transportation Pilot Program, implemented by Walk Bike Marin, was a resounding success...However, the actual bike counts and buried deep in the report and tell an entirely different story.

    Marin Independent Journal
  • As part of Mayor Ed Lee's Transportation 2030 Taskforce Initiative, the city and county of San Francisco is planning to ask voters to approve a $500 million general obligation bond on the November ballot. Among other things, the tax dollars would fund numerous street repairs; add to and improve the existing bicycle-lane network; and improve Muni service by implementing signal prioritization, purchasing new buses and light-rail vehicles, and constructing bus-only lanes along especially congested corridors. But the one public transit service that is vital to San Franciscans, yet only proposed to be allocated $30 million (for elevator and escalator refurbishment), is BART.

    SF Chronicle
  • ...(F)or years the bike commuting rate has remained roughly steady at just over a third of trips. Then last year the city’s bike commute mode share increased from 36 percent to 41 percent. Meanwhile, driving declined 3 percent as a share of commuting trips.

    Streetsblog SF
  • A Japanese rail giant wants to build a train that floats inches above the tracks using magnetic levitation, and whisks passengers from Tokyo to Osaka in less than half the current journey time. The proposal for the maglev train by Central Japan Railway, better known as JR Central, is expected to be approved (paywall) by Japanese lawmakers this year and form part of prime minister Shinzo Abe’s campaign to stimulate the Japanese economy. But the problem with the proposed maglev isn’t just its expensive price tag—at $90 billion, it would be one of the most expensive railway projects ever built–but its timing.

    CityLab
  • ...The good news this week for my dream vacation is that I no longer need to sign up for either: Amtrak announced that all its long-distance trains will feature baggage cars, which feature luggage racks that double as bike racks. By the end of the year, all 15 long-distance routes, including the Northeast Corridor, may have these cars. Which means no more messing with bike boxes. 

    CityLab